Saturday, September 27, 2014

Muddy Waters - At Newport 1960



More high resolution (98 KHZ / 24 Bit) stuff, another 180 gram vinil rip.

Review:
For many back in the early '60s, this was their first exposure to live recorded blues, and it's still pretty damn impressive some 40-plus years down the line. Muddy, with a band featuring Otis Spann, James Cotton, and guitarist Pat Hare, lays it down tough and cool with a set that literally had 'em dancing in the aisles by the set closer, a rippling version of "Got My Mojo Working," reprised again in a short encore version. Kicking off the album with a version of "I've Got My Brand on You" that positively burns the relatively tame (in comparison) studio take, Waters heads full bore through impressive versions of "Hoochie Coochie Man," Big Bill Broonzy's "Feel So Good," and "Tiger in Your Tank." A great breakthrough moment in blues history, where the jazz audience opened its ears and embraced Chicago blues. This album was in print almost continuously on vinyl for 20-plus years, and MCA reissued it in a fair CD version in 1986. At least one enterprising European bootlegger issued their version in the early '90s, but the real edition of this album to get is the March 2001 remastering from MCA. Transferred in high-resolution digital audio, it brings up the bass overall and the details of just about every aspect of the playing, as well as moving Muddy's singing several layers forward in the mix, so that one gets a very vivid stage ambience, making the original CD seem very ragged. The reissue has been augmented by the presence of four studio sides cut by the same group a month prior to the concert -- none hold a candle to the live material, but they do fill in a few holes in Muddy's U.S. discography. The new notes by Mary Katherine Aldin also give a much better picture of the background of the show and Muddy's performance (so where's the film of the performance that she mentions?)

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
WAV 850 MB
http://www.filefactory.com/file/4xbgpq2k669x/mwlan.rar

B.B. King - Live At The Regal - 1965


Here is another 96 KHZ/ 24 BIT rip. This time I bring you a 1965 german pressing.

Absolutely precious.


Review:
B.B. King is not only a timeless singer and guitarist, he's also a natural-born entertainer, and on Live at the Regal the listener is treated to an exhibition of all three of his talents. Over percolating horn hits and rolling shuffles, King treats an enthusiastic audience (at some points, they shriek after he delivers each line) to a collection of some of his greatest hits. The backing band is razor-sharp, picking up the leader's cues with almost telepathic accuracy. King's voice is rarely in this fine of form, shifting effortlessly between his falsetto and his regular range, hitting the microphone hard for gritty emphasis and backing off in moments of almost intimate tenderness. Nowhere is this more evident than at the climax of "How Blue Can You Get," where the Chicago venue threatens to explode at King's prompting. Of course, the master's guitar is all over this record, and his playing here is among the best in his long career. Displaying a jazz sensibility, King's lines are sophisticated without losing their grit. More than anything else, Live at the Regal is a textbook example of how to set up a live performance. Talking to the crowd, setting up the tunes with a vignette, King is the consummate entertainer. Live at the Regal is an absolutely necessary acquisition for fans of B.B. King or blues music in general. A high point, perhaps even the high point, for uptown blues.


Password and Link:
mississippimoan
WAV 850 MB
http://www.filefactory.com/file/6ktk0s4oanlb/bbklatr.rar

Friday, September 26, 2014

Big Maybelle - Blues Candy And Big Maybelle



Here is another high fidelity (96 KHZ / 24 Bit) vinyl rip I did for all those who love her 1956-1967 period.

Here you'll find 14 tracks that ranging from swing to raw tough blues.
This is a 1986 reissue released by SJ Records, Inc., New York.
Tracks Include:
Side A  Candy, Ring Dang Dilly, Blues Early, A Little Bird Told Me, So Long, That's A Pretty Good Love, Tell Me Who
Side B   Ramblin' Blues, Rock House, Don't Want to Cry, Pitiful, A Good Man is Hard To Find, Goin' Home, How It Lies

Password and Link:

mississippimoan
WAV files 96 KHZ, 24 BIT
http://www.filefactory.com/file/9k1q5kv18vj/bm.rar

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Pee Wee Crayton - The Modern Legacy Vols. 1 and 2



Review:
As an overview of Crayton's work for Modern from 1948-51, this might not be ideal, as only about half of it appeared on singles during that time; the rest was mostly unissued until the 1980s and 1990s, some making their first appearance on this CD. It also means that some of his Modern singles, including his biggest hit for the label (the ballad "I Love You So"), aren't here, as they were saved for another Ace volume of Crayton's Modern sides. Those considerations aside, this is superior Los Angeles jump blues, with the rare vault sides holding up about as well as what came out on singles. Were this the only anthology to appear of Crayton's Modern material -- heck, were it the only Crayton material, period -- it would still offer convincing proof of his stature as a significant bluesman, one who (like several Modern labelmates) was instrumental in the transition from the earliest electric blues to a harder R&B style. Although his singing and songwriting are good, what really makes this stand out is his incendiary guitar playing. In addition to taking good single-note solos, he made use of insistent, sometimes machine-gun-like jazzy chords that unpredictably shifted keys and pushed the limits of the day's amplification technology. That really comes to the fore on some of the uptempo instrumentals, like the nearly out-of-control "Pee Wee's Wild." Unlike many blues guitar heroes, though, he doesn't have to wait for the fast tunes to strut his stuff, as the crazily descending solo of the bump-and-grind "Please Come Back" demonstrates. On top of being a quality early electric blues anthology on its own merits, the CD makes a good case for Crayton being one of the more overlooked pioneers of the electric guitar as a whole.


Password and Links:
mississippimoan
mp3 160 kbps
http://www.filefactory.com/file/2q3kcmnb7z6j/pwcml1.rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/22nl1qkzkuy7/pwc2.rar


Monday, September 1, 2014

Jarekus Singleton - Refuse To Lose - 2014



Review:
Jarekus Singleton has an interesting story. Born in 1984 in Clinton, Mississippi, and raised on gospel, he was playing bass in his grandfather's church by the time he was nine years old. Later, switching to electric guitar, he absorbed the secular music around him, influenced by artists as diverse as Stevie Ray Vaughan, the three blues Kings (B.B., Albert, and Freddie), Brad Paisley (a pretty darn good guitar player), and rappers Jay-Z and Twista, among others. But Singleton was also a pretty darn good basketball player, good enough to be the starting point guard for three years at the University of Southern Mississippi, and apparently headed for a career in the NBA. Then he blew his ankle out in 2009, and that was it. So Singleton turned back to the guitar, and let it be said, whether he was aware of it or not, he was always a musician who happened to play basketball rather than the other way around. Refuse to Lose, his second album, and first for Alligator Records, makes one glad for basketball's loss. Singleton combines his fiery, fascinating, I-may-go-anywhere electric guitar leads with an urban, hip-hop, narrative songwriting style that still remains undoubtedly rooted in the blues, and when he's at his best, like with the opener and title tune here, "I Refuse to Lose," which is pretty much his life story, he hits all the corners, and brings blues right to the urban streets. Funky, gritty, soulful, and even jazzy songs like "Gonna Let Go" and "Keep Pushin'" may not be rap, but they share common themes and concerns. Singleton sweeps all of it together on I Refuse to Lose, even name-checking Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble in "Hell," a gritty chunk of gospel-blues complete with churchy organ. Make no mistake, though. This is not a hip-hop album, or even a pop album. It's a blues album, and that Singleton manages to stretch the blues genre while still maintaining all of its familiar attributes is a pretty impressive achievement.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 256 VBR kbps
http://www.filefactory.com/file/5eyntwvqi0m7/jsrtl.rar

Rick Estrin And The Nightcats - You Asked For It - 2014



Great Stuff!

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps
http://www.filefactory.com/file/1storux4cb11/re.rar

Friday, August 29, 2014

Robert Nighthawk - Live On Maxwell Street - 1964


Review:
Recorded by Norman Dayron live on the street (you can actually hear cars driving by!) in 1964 with just Robert Whitehead on drums and Johnny Young on rhythm guitar, Robert Nighthawk's slide playing (and single-string soloing, for that matter) are nothing short of elegant and explosive. Highlights include "The Maxwell Street Medley," which combines his two big hits "Anna Lee" and "Sweet Black Angel"; a mind-altering 12-bar solo on "The Time Have Come," which proves that Nighthawk's lead playing was just as well developed as his slide work; and a couple of wild instrumentals with Carey Bell sitting in on harmonica. Nighthawk sounds cool as a cucumber, presiding over everything with an almost genial charm while laying the toughest sounds imaginable. One of the top three greatest live blues albums of all times. The 2000 CD reissue on Bullseye Blues & Jazz adds five previously unreleased bonus tracks, although Nighthawk doesn't have a lead vocal on any of these. "The Real McCoy" is an instrumental; Young sings on "Big World Blues" and "All I Want for Breakfast/Them Kind of People"; Bell sings "I Got News for You," and J.B. Lenoir takes a guest lead vocal on "Mama Talk to Your Daughter" (though Peter Guralnick's liner notes express doubt that the singer is actually Lenoir).

Find track listing here:
http://www.allmusic.com/album/live-on-maxwell-street-mw0000265024

Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 192 kbps
http://www.filefactory.com/file/2i0rpb9l1g1/rnjlams.rar




Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Guitar Slim/Jelly Belly: Carolina Blues-New York City 1944 (1997) Arhoolie 460


Review:

Pure authentic country blues in the East Coast tradition from guitarists and singers Alex Seward and “Fat Boy” Hayes, billed as Guitar Slim & Jelly Belly on these recordings made in the 1950s. The two alternate as vocalists and even trade off verses on some selections. Alex Seward (Guitar Slim), a friend and associate of Brownie McGhee's, sings in a polished, urban style while Mr. Hayes contributes the rougher, rural vocals. The CD contains nearly the entire commercially recorded output of the duo.

“Their heyday was the '40's and they were one of the last outposts of the then outdated country blues, although with a very sophisticated city overtone. Their playing meshed beautifully together as did their voices ... an amazing bargain for anyone who loves the gentler sounds of the Carolinas.”

Tracks:

1. Ups And Downs Blues
2. Crooked Wife Blues
3. Snowing And Raining
4. No More Hard Time
5. She's Evil And Mean
6. Mike And Jerry
7. Don't Leave Me All By Myself
8. South Carolina Blues
9. Crying Won't Make Me Stay
10. Big Trouble Blues
11. Humming Bird Blues
12. Right And Wrong Woman
13. Southern Whistle Blues
14. Jail And Buddy Blues
15. Mean Girl Blues
16. Travelin' Boy's Blues
17. Railroad Blues
18. Yellow And Brown Woman
19. Bad Acting Woman
20. Christmas Time Blues
21. Cooking Big Woman
22. You're My Honey
23. Early Morning Blues
24. Isabel
25. Hard Luck Blues
26. Unhappy Home Blues
27. Working Man Blues
28. Why, Oh Why
29. Betty And Dupree

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps
http://www.filefactory.com/file/1u1ece3rkv03/gsjbcb.rar

Lucky Peterson - The Son of a Bluesman - 2014


Review:

Lucky Peterson's father was blues guitarist and singer James Peterson, a well-known regional musician who also owned the Governor's Inn, a premier blues nightclub in Buffalo, New York, which means Peterson grew up around his father's friends, who just happened to be touring and recording musicians like Jimmy Reed, Muddy Waters, and Bill Doggett, and he learned from all of them. He became fascinated with the Hammond B-3 organ as a young child, and by the time he was five, he'd proved to be a prodigy on it. Mentored by another of his father's friends, the great songwriter, bassist, arranger, and producer Willie Dixon, Peterson was still only five when he scored an R&B hit with the Dixon-produced "1-2-3-4," the novelty of it all landing him appearances on The Tonight Show, The Ed Sullivan Show, and others, and his debut album appeared in 1969. But Peterson had an exploratory nature, and while he could have had quite a career as a keyboard player, he picked up the guitar at the age of eight, and by the time he was a teen, he had developed an emotionally searing guitar style. He could have relaunched his career then, but instead he attended the Buffalo Academy of Performing Arts, and went out on the road as part of the touring bands of Etta James and Otis Rush, spent three years as Little Milton's keyboardist, another three years in Bobby "Blue" Bland's band, and backed jazz stars like Hank Crawford and Abbey Lincoln. He learned blues, jazz, soul, R&B, funk, and gospel, and by the time he made his re-debut as a bandleader with the Bob Greenlee-produced Lucky Strikes! in 1989, Peterson was a triple-threat multi-instrumentalist who managed to fuse R&B, jazz, gospel, funk, and rock with the blues. All of this leads up to this very personal and semi-autobiographical set, and his 18th album as a bandleader. The Son of a Bluesman, aside from being another fine set of Peterson's joyous fusion blues, is also the first of his albums that he has produced himself, and it has a warm, career-summing kind of feel to it. The title track, "The Son of a Bluesman," and the two different versions of the gospel-themed "I'm Still Here," give this album a personal and retrospective feel, as does the striking, and even silly "Joy," a straight-up family home recording featuring a rap interlude. But perhaps the best and most poignant track on an album full of standouts is the lovely instrumental "Nana Jarnell," dedicated to both Peterson's mother and his wife's mother, musician, singer, and songwriter Tamara Stovall-Peterson. Peterson's guitar lead on the track is a marvel of crying, elegantly balanced phrasing, almost horn-like or vocal-like, and it speaks and sings like the marvel it is. This is perhaps Peterson's most well-rounded and personal album yet, and it coheres in a wonderful arc, capturing the blues as an ever-flowing, joyous, and ultimately uplifting thing.

Tracks:
1. Blues In My Blood
2. Funky Broadway
3. Nana Jarnell
4. I Pity The Fool
5. Boogie-Woogie Blues Joint Party
6. I'm Still Here
7. The Son Of A Bluesman
8. I Can See Clearly Now
9. Joy
10. You Lucky Dog
11. I'm Still Here (Gospel)

Password and Link:

mississippimoan
FLAC
http://www.filefactory.com/file/6kyp78p4ytgd/lptsob.rar

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Johnnie Taylor - Wanted: One Soul Singer - 1967


Review:
Johnnie Taylor set the tone for his recording career at Stax with Wanted: One Soul Singer, a consistently gritty collection of blues and raw, hard-hitting Memphis soul. In addition to his appealing medium-sized hits "Just The One I've Been Lookin' For" and "I Had A Dream," Wanted (reissued on CD in 1991) boasts pleasant surprises ranging from the addictive "Toe-Hold" to gutsy versions of Merle Travis' "Sixteen Tons" and the standard "Blues In The Night." Adding lyrics to Herbie Hancock's "Watermelon Man," Taylor removes the song's jazz elements and turns it into pure Southern R&B. When Wanted was released, Taylor (who has occasionally been confused with bluesman Little Johnny Taylor) had yet to become the soul-radio fixture that "Who's Making Love" would make him, but these solid performances show that he was definitely on the right track.

Find this album's tracklist here:
http://www.allmusic.com/album/wanted-one-soul-singer-mw0000674917

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 224 kbps
http://www.filefactory.com/file/4vui029wxhcn/jtwoss.rar

Johnnie Taylor - Raw Blues - 1969



Review:
While the "Raw" part of the title may be overstating the case just a bit, "Blues" describes this disc pretty well, thank you -- on his fourth album, Johnnie Taylor shifts his focus away from Stax's trademark Southern soul stylings towards leaner and grittier blues-based performances, a style he'd already shown a knack for on his earlier sets. Raw Blues still walks a line between soul and blues, with the sweet-and-sour tone of The Memphis Horns sometimes stacking the deck in favor of the former, but "Part Time Love", "Hello Sundown" and "You Can't Keep A Good Man Down" generate a potent late-night mood vibe which match the downcast authority of Taylor's voice. And if the always air-tight performances of the Stax studio crew (including Steve Cropper and Isaac Hayes) pack enough heat to turn "You Can't Win With A Losing Hand" and "That Bone" into potent dance floor material, Taylor's rough but passionate delivery never lets this get too close to the Land of the Slick. A strong and heartfelt set that serves as an important precursor to Taylor's later blues-oriented sets for Malaco.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 192 kbps
http://www.filefactory.com/file/2jd595839uc1/jtrb.rar

Monday, August 25, 2014

Slim Harpo - Shake Your Hips



Here's some quality stuff by Slim Harpo.
Check out back cover for more info on the material you'll find here.
Password and Link:
mississippimoan
FLAC
http://www.filefactory.com/file/77i7mgrekavr/shsyh.rar

Little Junior Parker - Driving Wheel - 1962



Review by Mark Barry:

Originally issued in 1962 on Duke Records DLP-76 in its rare full-colour "Cadillac" sleeve, the album was re-issued a year later in 1963 (also DLP-76) and yet again in 1974 as part of the ABC/Duke reissue series on DLPX-76. Both the 1963 and 1974 reissues used different artwork - they used what's become known as the "driving wheel" sleeve. This 12-track Hip-O Select CD reissue of November 2006 (B0006408-02) unfortunately uses that same artwork...and as you can see, it's staggeringly dull. A trawl of the net will show you the original beautiful artwork - and when you see it, you'll realise what a sloppy choice Hip-O Select has made.

There is no booklet either, just a next-to-useless one-page inlay barely offering any info, no history of the record, no photos, not even session details, no singles pictured - nothing! And when it does give us info, it gets it wrong - it quotes the album as being issued in 1973 and its catalogue number as being DLPX-76 - the 1974 reissue catalogue number! There's no bonus tracks either (see 7" singles below) - a bit slap dash to say the bloody least.

Still, it is remastered by noted engineer GAVIN LURSSEN and given that the songs were put down using less than fantastical recording techniques, he's done a remarkable job - very clean and evocative of early Sixties Chicago blues - even if the echoing mono recordings sound a little like re-channelled stereo from time to time. With brass on almost every track, the sound is loud and takes some getting used to - but when you do, the album becomes so enjoyable - one gem after another. At times it sounds like the "American Graffiti" soundtrack - evocative of cars and girls and drive-ins...

Here's the breakdown (29:04 minutes):
1. Driving Wheel (a Roosevelt Sykes cover)
2. I Need Your Love So Bad (a Percy Mayfield cover)
3. Foxy Devil (a Deadric Malone song)
[Deadric Malone is a pseudonym for DON ROBEY; Robey owned Duke & Peacock Records and was a prolific songwriter)
4. Somebody Broke This Heart Of Mine (a Deadric Malone song)
5. How Long Can This Go On (a Junior Parker song)
6. Yonders Wall (an Elmore James cover)
7. Annie get Your Yo-Yo (a Deadric Malone/Joseph Scott song)
8. Tin Pan Alley (a Robert Geddins cover)
9. Someone Somewhere (a Junior Parker song)
10. Seven Days (a Junior Parker/Deadric Malone song)
11. The Tables Have Turned (a Junior Parker song)
12. Sweet Talking Woman (a Deadric Malone song)

USA 7" singles off and around the album were:

1. "Driving Wheel" b/w "Seven Days", May 1961 on Duke 335
2. "In The Dark" b/w "How Long Can This Go On", November 1961 on Duke 341
3. "Annie Get Your Yo-Yo" b/w "Mary Jo", February 1962 on Duke 345
4. "I Feel Alright Again" b/w "Sweeter As The Days Go By", 1962 on Duke 351
5. "Foxy Devil" b/w "Someone Somewhere", 1962 on Duke 357
6. "The Tables Have Turned" b/w "Yonders Wall", 1963 on Duke 367

As you can see from the two lists above, only 8 of the 12 tracks across the 6 singles are featured on this CD - and with a bit of effort on the part of Hip-O Select, the remaining 4 could have been included as relevant bonus tracks. "In The Dark" and "I Feel Alright Again" are available on other compilations, but to my knowledge "Sweeter As The Days Go By" and "Mary Jo" aren't.

If you wanted a taster of how it sounds, iTunes is offering the entire album as a download - check out the lovely "Someone Somewhere" (the title of this review is lyrics from it) or the Ruth Brown Atlantic rhythm and blues feel of "Foxy Devil" and you'll get a good idea of what "Driving Wheel" is like.

A legendary "Hall Of Fame" blues album - docked a star for Hip-O Select's less-than-stellar reissue of it.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps
http://www.filefactory.com/file/223coaidm2lr/ljpdw.rar

Clifton Chenier - King Of The Bayous - 1970


Review:

After gaining initial notoriety in the '50s and '60s on Specialty Records and a variety of small Texas and Louisiana labels, Zydeco King Clifton Chenier brought the blues-fueled Cajun music he practically invented to Chris Strachwitz's roots label Arhoolie, subsequently recording a series of fine albums including 1970's King of the Bayous. Featuring brother and longtime partner Cleveland Chenier on rubboard, Robert St. Judy on drums, Joe Morris on bass and Antoine Victor on guitar, King of the Bayous includes Chenier's standard blend of zydeco two-step, waltzes and blues, and provides an excellent taste of what the band no doubt played on countless one-niters along the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. Zydeco-brand blues predominates with Chenier originals "Hard to Love Someone," "Who Can Your Good Man Be" and "I Am Coming Home," in addition to a cover of the honky-tonk weeper "Release Me." Offering a contrast to the blues and something for the dancers, the band lays down a lively two-step beat on "Tu Le Ton Son Ton," "Josephine Par Se Ma Femme" and "Zodico Two Step." Throughout the varied set, Chenier's irrepressible vocals and accordion playing stand out. A nice sample of bayou zydeco by one of its finest and most original practitioners.

Find this album's track list here:
http://www.allmusic.com/album/king-of-the-bayous-mw0000675738

Password and Link:
mp3 128 kbps
mississippimoan
http://www.filefactory.com/file/4j67saio4uz1/cckotb.rar

Sunday, October 13, 2013

Champion Jack Dupree - Blues for Everybody - 1990


Review:

Although Dupree seldom paused at any one label for very long, the piano pounder did hang around at Cincinnati-based King Records from 1951 to 1955 -- long enough to wax the 20 sides comprising this set and a few more that regrettably aren't aboard. By this time, Dupree was a seasoned R&B artist, storming through "Let the Doorbell Ring" and "Mail Order Woman" and emphasizing his speech impediment on "Harelip Blues" (one of those not-for-the-politically correct numbers). Most of these tracks were done in New York; sidemen include guitarist Mickey Baker and saxist Willis Jackson

Tracks:
1.Heartbreaking Woman
2.Watchin' My Stuff
3.Ain't No Meat on the Bone
4.The Blues Got Me Rockin'
5.Tongue Tied Blues
6.Please Tell Me Baby
7.Harelip Blues
8.Two Below Zero
9.Let the Doorbell Ring
10.Blues for Everybody
11.That's My Pa
12.She Cooks Me Cabbage
13.Failing Health Blues
14.Stumbling Block
15.Mail Order Woman
16.Silent Partner
17.House Rent Party
18.Rub a Little Boogie
19.Walking The Blues
20.Daybreak Rock

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
FLAC, 260 MB
http://www.filefactory.com/file/64en9xh5vxyr/cjdbfe.rar

Saturday, October 12, 2013

Lazy Lester - Blues Stop Knockin' - 2001


Review:

Not the most nimble harp player on the blues block, Lazy Lester nonetheless connects when he's backed by a sympathetic band, as he is on this recording, his first in three years. Aided immensely by guitarists Jimmie Vaughen and Derek O'Brien (who also produces) on all but one track, the 70-year-old Lester returns to his swampy Excello label past on this sturdy release. Although it was recorded in Texas, Lester effortlessly evokes his Louisiana roots in a set predominantly consisting of covers that feature his moody harmonica and deep, bluesy sound. With muscular songs and a band who knows their way around a muddy groove, Lester is in fine, low-key form throughout. Far from energetic, as his moniker implies, he sounds remarkably inspired throughout. When he hits his mark on the slow blues of "Sad City Blues" (featuring guests Sue Foley, Sarah Brown, and Gene Taylor) or connects on the Jimmy Reed-ish "Miss You Like the Devi," his quivering voice and unamplified harp evoke the sound of those great '60s songs he turned into models of the genre. He even resembles Muddy Waters on "Go Ahead," gradually unwinding on a slow shuffle. Re-recording some of his old favorites, like the self-referential "They Call Me Lazy," is a questionable move for many elder musicians hoping to regain a lost spark, but these versions maintain the slow, laconic, if not quite lazy atmospheric vibe that made his classic stuff so influential. Not a great blues album, but a surprisingly good one and better than most would have expected from one of the blues' fringe figures in his waning years.

Tracks:

1.Blues Stop Knockin'
2.I Love You Baby
3.I'm You Breadmaker, Baby
4.Go Ahead
5.Gonna Stick to You Baby
6.I'm Gonna Miss (Like the Devil)
7.Ya Ya
8.They Call Me Lazy
9.Ponderosa Shuffle
10.No Special Rider Blues
11.I Told My Little Woman
12.Sad City Blues

Password and Link:

mississippimoan
FLAC, 371 MB
http://www.filefactory.com/file/ldm5xas5q1h/ll.rar

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Jimmy Rogers - Chicago Bound - 1976


Review:

Starkly printed in black and white with washed-out, grainy photographs, this is one heavy slab of blues by a player who is not as well-known as he should be. Guitarist Jimmy Rogers was usually overshadowed by the leaders he worked for, Muddy Waters particularly. He was also sometimes confused with the hillbilly singer Jimmie Rodgers, and although they might have sounded good together, they don't have anything in common. This reissue collection grabs 14 tracks done at various times in the mostly early '50s which involve practically a who's who of performers associated with the most intense and driving Chicago blues. This includes the aforementioned Waters, leaving behind his role as leader for a few numbers to add some stinging guitar parts. There is also a pair of harmonica players, each of whom could melt vinyl siding with their playing. These are the Walters, big and little, as in Big Walter Horton and Little Walter. Pianist Otis Spann, bassist Willie Dixon, and drummer Fred Belew are also on hand, meaning the rhythm section action is first class. Blues listeners who have only skimmed the surface of the music may not have really discovered Rogers, as his reputation increased in the years after his death and he had nowhere near the following and status of Waters or even Little Walter. Some of the tracks here are numbers the musicians got together and played with Rogers at the end of what was probably an already grueling session by Waters. "Sloppy Drunk" is a killer track that joins the long list of great blues numbers concerning the inebriated, while "Walking by Myself" is a fine example of the kind of shuffling rhythm these players are so good at. The CD era was an opportunity to put together larger selections of Rogers' material, complete with outtakes and selections that are much rarer than the material here. If a listener's reaction to this album is as positive as it ought to be, they can be assured the pickings will be equally tasty if they decide to go for more extensive documentation of this artist.


Tracks:

1.You're the One
2.Money, Marbles and Chalk
3.Luedella
4.Act Like You Love Me
5.Back Door Friend
6.Last Time
7.I Used to Have a Woman
8.Sloppy Drunk
9.Blues Leave Me Alone
10.Out on the Road
11.Goin' Away Baby
12.That's All Right
13.Chicago Bound
14.Walkin' By Myself


Password and Link:

mississippimoan
FLAC, 166 MB
http://www.filefactory.com/file/thdbfzru4az/jr&mwcb.rar

Snooky Pryor - In This Mess Up My Chest - 1994


Review:

Pryor reaffirms his mastery of postwar blues harp over the course of this sturdy set, again done with the help of some fine Texas and Chicago players. Pryor's downhome vocals shine on the distinctive "Bury You in a Paper Sack" and "Stick Way Out Behind."


Tracks:

   1.Bury You in a Paper Sack
   2.Pay for All Our Sins
   3.Stick Way Out Behind
   4.Can I Get a Witness?
   5.When the Saints Go Marching In
   6.Take It Easy, Greasy
   7.Slow Down, Baby
   8.Bluebird Blues
   9.Hello, Little Baby
  10.She Tried to Ruin Me
  11.My Baby's Too Sweet to Die
  12.Judgement Day


Password and Link:
mississippimoan
FLAC 352 MB
http://www.filefactory.com/file/4s0zmxtshta1/spitmutmc_rar

Johnny Shines - Standing at the Crossroads - 1970


Review:

This is one of several albums this artist made in the early '70s that stand as a masterpiece of the acoustic country blues genre. Johnny Shines had begun recording in the mid-'60s, the albums done with electric guitar and full-combo backup, one of them reportedly cut after he hadn't picked up an instrument in years. It was as if he reinvented himself in the following decade, playing pristine and flawless acoustic slide guitar pieces complete with shuffling, stuttering, and stimulatingly complicated tempos. The message was that he had been a young sidekick to Robert Johnson and had absorbed everything, although no deal had been made with the Devil. Shines was a steady, dependable, religious, and forthright chap who lived in Tuscaloosa, AL, and held down a steady job as a construction foreman. Mild-mannered and extremely intellectual, he let loose the reserve of emotion when doing a Delta blues number. The magic and heart were in his fingertips as well as in his voice, which sounds stupendous here. The emergence of the Johnson song canon into his repertoire, done with almost Baroque detail, was also something of a revelation. Some of Shines' earlier albums had featured songs that almost seemed made up on the spot. He was good at that, and was rumored to have played whole sets that were completely improvised when working the country juke joints of his home state, but on this album he showed what he could do when sinking his teeth into a bona fide blues classic. "Kind Hearted Woman" is the musical equivalent of an absolutely perfect chopped-barbecue sandwich with sauce the way they do it in Tuscaloosa, and obviously of much less offense to vegetarians when taken in this form. There were 11 perfect songs chosen by Pete Welding from his set of recording sessions for this project. Once again this great producer has come up with a blues release that is basically a required item for any good collection of this genre.

Tracks:

1.Standing At The Crossroads
2.Milk Cow's Troubles
3.Death Hearse Blues
4.Drunken Man's Prayer
5.Hoo-Doo Snake Doctor Blues
6.It's A Lowdown Dirty Shame
7.How Long
8.Crying Black Angel
9.Down in Spirit
10.Your Troubles Can't Be Like Mine
11.Kind-Hearted Woman
12.Baby Sister Blues
13.My Rat
14.Don't Take A Country Woman
15.Kind-Hearted Woman (Alt.)
16.Death Hearse Blues (Alt.)

Password and Link:
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FLAC, 276 MB
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Monday, September 9, 2013

Brownie McGhee, Sonny Terry with Earl Hooker - I Couldn't Believe My Eyes plus.... - 1976.




The Dynamic Duo Of The Blues Were Truly An Awesome Pair. When They Joined Earl Hooker For These Sessions, The Results Were Astounding. Now These Tapes Have Been Cleaned Up And Remastered To Be Heard The Way They Were Always Meant To Be.-- by Amazon 
Tracklist:1. Black Cat Bone 3:20
2. Brownie's New Blues 5:01
3. Poor Man Blues 2:51
4. Tell Me Why 6:16
5. My Baby's So Fine 3:06
6. You Just Usin' Me For A Convenience 3:47
7. Hole In The Wall 3:49
8. Long Way From Home 1:57
9. Don't Wait For Me 3:24
10. I'm In Love With You Baby 4:31
11. Parcel Post Blues 4:31
12. When I Was Drinkin' 2:43
13. I Couldn't Believe My Eyes 3:40
14. Life Is A Gamble 4:30
15. Don't Mistreat Me 3:25
16. Rock Island Line 2:23

Info:
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Sunday, August 25, 2013

Arthur Big Boy Crudup - Document Complete Recorded Works, 4 Albums 1993


Arthur Crudup may well have been Elvis Presley's favorite bluesman. The swivel-hipped rock god recorded no less than three of "Big Boy's" Victor classics during his seminal rockabilly heyday: "That's All Right Mama" (Elvis' Sun debut in 1954), "So Glad You're Mine," and "My Baby Left Me." Often lost in all the hubbub surrounding Presley's classic covers are Crudup's own contributions to the blues lexicon. He didn't sound much like anyone else, and that makes him an innovator, albeit a rather rudimentary guitarist (he didn't even pick up the instrument until he was 30 years old).Around 1940, Crudup migrated to Chicago from Mississippi. Times were tough at first; he was playing for spare change on the streets and living in a packing crate underneath an elevated train track when powerful RCA/Bluebird producer Lester Melrose dropped a few coins in Crudup's hat. Melrose hired Crudup to play a party that 1941 night at Tampa Red's house attended by the cream of Melrose's stable: Big Bill Broonzy, Lonnie Johnson, Lil Green. A decidedly tough crowd to impress -- but Crudup overcame his nervousness with flying colors. By September of 1941, he was himself an RCA artist.Crudup pierced the uppermost reaches of the R&B lists during the mid-'40s with "Rock Me Mama," "Who's Been Foolin' You," "Keep Your Arms Around Me," "So Glad You're Mine," and "Ethel Mae." He cut the original "That's All Right" in 1946 backed by his usual rhythm section of bassist Ransom Knowling and drummer Judge Riley, but it wasn't a national hit at the time. Crudup remained a loyal and prolific employee of Victor until 1954, when a lack of tangible rewards for his efforts soured Crudup on Nipper (he had already cut singles in 1952 for Trumpet disguised as Elmer James and for Checker as Percy Lee Crudup).In 1961, Crudup surfaced after a long layoff with an album for Bobby Robinson's Harlem-based Fire logo dominated by remakes of his Bluebird hits. Another lengthy hiatus preceded Delmark boss Bob Koester's following the tip of Big Joe Williams to track down the elusive legend (Crudup had drifted into contract farm labor work in the interim). Happily, the guitarist's sound hadn't been dimmed by Father Time: his late-'60s work for Delmark rang true as he was reunited with Knowling (Willie Dixon also handled bass duties on some of his sides). Finally, Crudup began to make some decent money, playing various blues and folk festivals for appreciative crowds for a few years prior to his 1974 death.--by Bill Dahl


 Arthur Big Boy Crudup - Complete Recorded Works Vol.1 (1941-1946) (1993)

Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup was an important transition figure between 1930s Chicago blues, early R&B, and rock & roll, being an early influence on Elvis Presley. On this first of four Document CDs that reissue all of his recordings from the 1940s and '50s, Crudup mostly performs duets with either Joe McCoy or Ransom Knowling on bass or Melvin Draper, Charles Saunders, or Jump Jackson on drums. The first session is unusual in that Crudup is heard on acoustic guitar, but he was playing electric by 1942 and was largely distinctive from the start. Among the more memorable of the 24 numbers (which conclude with a pair of trio selections with Ransom Knowling and drummer Judge Riley) are "Black Pony Blues," "Standing at My Window," "Gonna Follow My Baby," "Give Me a 32-20," "Mean Old Frisco," "Raised to My Hand," "Cool Disposition," and "That's Your Red Wagon." All four of these Crudup discs are easily recommended to blues collectors.--by Scott Yanow

Tracklist

1. Black Pony Blues 3:23
2. Death Valley Blues 3:15
3. Kind Lover Blues 3:07
4. If I Get Lucky 3:06
5. Standing At My Window 2:50
6. Gonna Follow My Baby 2:51
7. Give Me A 32-20 2:53
8. My Mama Don't Allow Me 3:10
9. Mean Old 'Frisco Blues 2:38
10. Raised To My Hand 3:09
11. Cool Disposition 3:10
12. Who's Been Foolin' You 3:17
13. Rock Me Mama 2:59
14. Keep Your Arms Around Me Mama 2:34
15. Dirt Road Blues 3:08
16. I'm In The Mood 3:03
17. That's Your Red Wagon 3:14
18. She's Gone 3:03
19. Ethel Mae 3:08
20. So Glad You're Mine 2:48
21. Boy Friend Blues 3:01
22. No More Lovers 2:48
23. You Got To Reap 3:00
24. Chicago Blues 3:10


Arthur Big Boy Crudup - Complete Recorded Works Vol.2 (1946-1949) (1993)

Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup's "That's All Right" (which he first recorded in 1946) became a hit for Elvis Presley eight years later. Strangely enough, three of the four songs that Crudup recorded on Sept. 6, 1946 all have the same "That's All Right" melody, although each utilize different lyrics. (Crudup was clearly more talented as a lyricist than as a composer.) Nevertheless, he is heard in prime form on the five sessions from 1946-1949, all of which have him joined by the driving bassist Ransom Knowling and drummer Judge Riley. The trio digs into such numbers (in addition to "That's All Right") as Crudup's "After Hours," "Gonna Be Some Changes Made" (which has Big Boy using the words of the standard "There'll Be Some Changes Made" but turning the song into a blues), "Hey Mama, Everything's All Right," "Dust My Broom," and "Shout Sister Shout." Timeless blues.--by Scott Yanow

Tracklist

1. Crudup's After Hours 2:57
2. I Want My Lovin' 3:01
3. That's All Right 2:55
4. I Don't Know It 2:52
5. Cry Your Blues Away 3:11
6. Crudup's Vicksburg Blues 3:14
7. Gonna Be Some Changes Made 2:45
8. Train Fare Blues 2:47
9. Katie Mae 3:04
10. Hey Mama, Everything's All Right 2:57
11. Hoodoo Lady Blues 3:04
12. Lonesome World To Me 3:14
13. Roberta Blues 2:48
14. Just Like A Spider 3:17
15. Some Day 2:59
16. That's Why I'm Lonesome 3:06
17. Tired Of Worry 2:46
18. Dust My Broom 2:41
19. Hand Me Down My Walking Cane 2:46
20. Shout Sister Shout 2:42
21. Come Back Baby 2:38
22. You Know That I Love You 2:45

Arthur Big Boy Crudup - Complete Recorded Works Vol.3 (1949-1952) (1993)

The third of four Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup Document CDs (which completely reissue his recordings from the 1940s and '50s) features the singer/guitarist in trio settings, mostly with bassist Ransom Knowling and drummer Judge Riley. Crudup's expressive vocals and the driving rhythm section make such songs as "She's Just Like Caldenia," "Oo-Wee Darling," "Anytime Is the Right Time," "Love Me Mama," "Where Did You Stay Last Night," and "Goin' Back to Georgia" quite memorable. Listening to these consistently exciting performances gives listeners strong clues as to where rock & roll came from.--by Scott Yanow

Tracklist

1. Mercy Blues 2:49
2. She's Just Like Caldonia 2:56
3. Mean Old Santa Fe 2:30
4. Behind Closed Doors 2:41
5. She Ain't Nothin' But Trouble 2:52
6. Oo-Wee Darling 3:00
7. Anytime Is The Right Time 2:58
8. My Baby Left Me 2:31
9. Nobody Wants Me 2:45
10. Star Bootlegger 2:39
11. Too Much Competition 2:54
12. Second Man Blues 2:53
13. Pearly Lee 2:50
14. Love Me Mama 3:11
15. Never No More 3:06
16. Where Did You Stay Last Night 2:50
17. I'm Gonna Dig Myself A Hole 3:18
18. I'm Gonna Dig Myself A Hole (alt. take) 3:01
19. Goin' Back To Georgia 2:41
20. Mr. So And So 2:41
21. Do It If You Want To 2:46
22. Keep On Drinkin' 2:40


Arthur Big Boy Crudup - Complete Recorded Works Vol.4 (1952-1954) (1993)


Tracklist


1. Worried About You Baby 3:05
2. Late In The Evening 3:04
3. Lookin' For My Baby 2:33
4. Nelvina 2:59
5. My Baby Boogies All The Time 3:09
6. I Wonder 2:19
7. Baby I've Been Mistreated 3:05
8. You Didn't Mean A Word 3:05
9. Open Your Book 2:44
10. Tears In My Eyes 2:47
11. Tears In My Eyes (alt. tk.) 3:02
12. Gonna Find My Baby 2:45
13. Make A Little Love 3:10
14. I Love My baby 2:41
15. My Wife And Women 2:25
16. The War Is Over 2:54
17. Fall On Your Knees And Pray 2:56
18. If You Ever Been To Georgia 2:35
19. Help Me To Bear This Heavy Load 2:43
20. I Love You 2:48
21. She's Got No Hair 2:03
22. Looka There, She Got No Hair 2:03
23. I Love Her Just The Same 2:11


Info:

FLAC 200MB each cd.
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Mississippi Fred McDowell - This Ain't No Rock N' Roll - 1969/1995



Adding ten bonus tracks to the original release, 1995's This Ain't No Rock N' Roll is an impressive, extensive collection of the later work of Mississippi Fred McDowell. Though he uses a backup band consisting of second guitar, bass, and drums, the majority of the tracks simply feature McDowell unaccompanied, showing off his masterful bottleneck guitar skills. The material here documents a rather transitional period for the artist, as he was using electric instruments and expanding his repertoire to include some traditional songs which he was rediscovering. To be sure, a good deal of the material is of traditional origin, with "Levee Camp Blues," "When the Saints Go Marching In," and "Dankin's Farm." Covering over 75 minutes and 18 tracks, this is a pretty complete picture of where McDowell was in the late '60s.-- by Matt Fink

Tracklist

1. My Baby 2:33
2. Leevee Camp Blues 5:34
3. When The Saints Go Marching In 3:11
4. Diamond Ring 4:26
5. Dankin´s Farm 3:28
6. You Ain´t Treatin´ Me Right 2:49
7. Ethel Mae Blues 5:29
8. Meet Me In The Froggy Bottom 3:41
9. Mama Said I´m Crazy 6:01
10. I Heard Somebody Calling Me 5:56
11. Keep Your Lamp Trimmed And Burning 3:58
12. I Wonder What Have I Done Wrong 4:26
13. I Worked Old Lu And I Worked Old Bess 5:32
14. Jim, Steam Killed Lula 4:13
15. Worried Now, Won´t Be Worried Long 3:08
16. Going Away, Won´t Be Gone Long 3:29
17. Going Down That Gravel Bottom 4:32
18. Bye, Bye Little Girl 4:17


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James Son Thomas - Mississippi Delta Blues Man - 1981/2001



No one could ever say that James "Son" Thomas didn't have the right to sing the blues. A Mississippi share cropper and grave digger (and later, a furniture store laborer), Thomas lived a hard life that included being shot by his ex-wife, being severely burned by a space heater, surgery for a brain tumor, long battles with emphysema and epilepsy, and the final series of strokes and heart attacks that finally took his life. Along the way he developed into a skilled folk sculptor and a captivating guitarist and singer. He was officially "discovered" in 1967 by folk researcher William Ferris, who featured Thomas as the centerpiece of his book Blues From the Delta as well as several short films, opening the way for Thomas' entry on to the international folk and blues circuit, which led to this album, which was recorded in May 1981 in the Netherlands by Leo Bruin. It features Thomas alone with an acoustic guitar holding forth on fairly traditional Delta blues material in a generally high, near falsetto voice (he drops down in tone for a couple of songs, like "Hard Time Blues"). The hushed intimacy of the setting gives several of these tracks tremendous power, and although Thomas isn't particularly unique or innovative on anything here, his calm sincerity and easy style are immensely affecting. He sounds at times a little like Skip James, particularly on the eerie "Devil Blues," which was probably derived, in part, from James' "Devil Got My Woman." As an intimate glimpse at one of the last true folk-blues musicians from the Delta, this is a valuable historical recording, but also an enjoyable one.-- by Steve Leggett


 Tracklist

1. Big Leg Woman 4:10
2. High Brown 4:45
3. Whiskey Headed Woman 2:26
4. Devil Blues 4:45
5. Take A Little Walk 2:57
6. Cool Water Blues 4:10
7. Lonesome Road Blues 3:54
8. Black Rat 3:18
9. Hard Time Blues 4:22
10. Catfish Blues 4:09
11. My Black Mare 3:43
12. Bull Cow Blues 3:35

Info:
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Saturday, August 24, 2013

Lightnin' Hopkins - Double Blues - 1973/1989



Lightnin' Hopkins' plaintive, soft-rolling blues style is exemplified on "Let's Go Sit on the Lawn," "Just a Wristwatch on My Arm," "I'm a Crawling Black Snake," Willie Dixon's "My Babe," and others. Accompanied only by himself on guitar (and oh what a guitar he plays), Leonard Gaskin (bass), and Herb Lovelle (drums), Hopkins' seductive, intricate guitar picks and strums will dance around in your head long after this CD has played. His voice, which sounds like it's aged in Camels and Jim Beam, conveys his heartfelt sagas to the fullest. A prolific songwriter, Hopkins wrote every song except the Dixon tune.-- by Andrew Hamilton


Tracklist


1. Let's Go Sit On the Lawn 4:17
2. I'm Taking A Devil of a Chance 3:56
3. I Got Tired 4:40
4. I Asked The Bossman 6:46
5. Just A Wristwatch On My Arm 3:38
6. I Woke Up This Morning 5:55
7. I Was Standing on 75 Highway 5:14
8. I'm Going To Build Me a Heaven of My Own 5:59
9. My Babe 3:23
10. Too Many Drivers 3:32
11. I'm A Crawling Black Snake 4:51
12. Rocky Mountain Blues 3:54
13. I Mean Goodbye 3:03
14. The Howling Wolf 3:57
15. Black Ghost Blues 3:34
16. Darling, Do You Remember Me? 3:43
17. Lonesome Graveyard 5:30

All Selections Recorded May4-5,1964

Personnel:
Lightnin' Hopkins - Guitar,Vocals
Leonard Gaskin - Bass
Herbie Lovelle - Drums

Info:FLAC 354MB
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Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Josh White - The Elektra Years - 2004.



Josh White had a long and varied career, beginning as a session guitarist in the 1920s, then had his own run of stellar blues 78s for Paramount and Columbia in the 1930s, becoming a cabaret bluesman in New York in the 1940s, only to be blacklisted as the McCarthy era dawned, which led to his association with Jac Holzman's fledgling Elektra label in 1955. White recorded seven well-conceived LPs for Holzman between 1955 and 1962, and they restarted his career once again. The Elektra Years collects some of the highlights of that run in a two-disc set, including "You Don't Know My Mind" (a remake of a Virginia Liston 78 from 1923), "Silicosis Blues" (which White first recorded back in 1936), "Jim Crow Train," "Jelly Jelly" (complete with the sound of White gargling vodka at the onset), the jailhouse gospel of "Trouble," and "Jesus Gonna Make Up My Dyin' Bed," which White first tracked in 1934 and was more or less his signature song. The collection ends with a striking 1933 version of "Lay Some Flowers On My Grave," which White recorded in 1933 for ARC Records when he was only 19 years old. Many hardcore Delta blues aficionados found White's version of the blues to be a little too refined to be authentic, and these days he is seldom placed in the company of his rediscovered contemporaries like Mississippi John Hurt, Son House, Bukka White, or Skip James, which is a shame. It's true that White had much more of a political and cultural agenda than any of those players, and if he pandered at times to stereotypical notions, it was always in the interest of educating his audiences. In addition, White was an astounding acoustic guitarist, and his laser-guided guitar runs were always tonally perfect. As a guitarist alone, he is due for a reassessment, and these Elektra recordings from Rhino Handmade are the perfect place to start, since he was never recorded in a more favorable sonic setting.-- by Steve Leggett

Tracks cd 1

1. St. James Infirmary 3:40
2. You Don't Know My Mind 3:57
3. Number Twelve Train 3:49
4. Run, Mona, Run 1:39
5. Silicosis Blues 4:27
6. Red Sun 4:17
7. Southern Exposure 3:16
8. Timber 2:12
9. One Meat Ball 3:42
10. Gloomy Sunday 3:08
11. Free and Equal Blues 3:51
12. Jim Crow Train 2:52
13. Live the Life 2:23
14. Did You Ever Love a Woman? 3:16
15. Delaia's Gone 3:51
16. So Soon in the Morning 2:20
17. Hallelujia 3:46
18. Mother on that Train 3:44
19. Taking Names 3:38
20. Joshua Fit The Battle Of Jericho 2:47
21. Scandalise My Name 1:55
22. Raise a Ruckus 1:57


Tracks cd 2

1. The Story of John Henry 23:41
2. Where were you baby? 3:40
3. Jelly, Jelly 5:58
4. Woman sure is a curious critter 2:02
5. Empty Bed Blues 3:21
6. Bottle up and go 2:27
7. One for my baby 3:08
8. Sam Hall 2:59
9. Prison Bound Blues 2:27
10. Trouble 3:51
11. Ball and Chain Blues 3:10
12. 'Twas on a monday 2:25
13. Going Home Boys 3:20
14. Told my Captain 2:23
15. Jesus Gonna make up my dying bed 4:11
16. Bury My Body 4:01
17. Lay Some Flowers on my Grave 3:03

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Monday, August 5, 2013

Big Bill Broonzy - In Chronological Order, Vols 1, 2 and 3 - 1994.

Volume 1



This is a particularly fascinating CD, for it has the first 26 selections ever recorded by Big Bill Broonzy as a leader. The beginning of Document's complete reissuance of all of Broonzy's early recordings, the set starts with four duet numbers that Broonzy cut during 1927-28 with fellow guitarist John Thomas. Although his style was already a bit recognizable, the young guitarist/vocalist really started coming into his own in 1930. There are 15 selections from that year included on this set, with Big Bill often using the pseudonyms of Sammy Sampson or Big Bill Johnson; in fact, even the final seven numbers (from 1932) had him billed as the latter. The CD finds Broonzy evolving from a country-blues musician who already had strong technique into a star of hokum records. Among the many highlights are "Big Bill Blues" (different versions in 1928 and 1932), "I Can't Be Satisfied," "Pig Meat Strut," "Beedle Um Bum" and "Selling That Stuff." Pianist Georgia Tom Dorsey helps out on three numbers. Big Bill Broonzy fans have a right to rejoice about the existence of this wonderful series.-- by Scott Yanow

Tracks

1. House Rent Stomp 2:39
2. Big Bill Blues (20373) 3:00
3. Down in the Basement Blues 3:30
4. Starvation BLues (20923) 3:18
5. I can't Be Satisfied (9599) 2:47
6. Grandma's Farm 2:26
7. Skoodle Do Do (9601) 2:46
8. Tadpole Blues 2:32
9. Skoodle Do Do (16573) 2:47
10. Saturday Night Rub (9594) 2:57
11. Pig Meat Strut (9587) 2:50
12. Papa's Gettin' Hot 2:47
13. Police Station Blues 2:44
14. They can't Do That 2:51
15. State Street Woman 3:01
16. Meanest Kind of Blues 3:01
17. I Got the Blues for My Baby 2:56
18. The Banker's Blues 2:34
19. How You Wan't Done? (17284) 2:49
20. Too Too Train BLues (18383) 3:01
21. Mistreatin' Mamma (18384) 3:00
22. Big Bill Blues (18385) 3:00
23. Brown Skin Shuffle 2:58
24. Stove Pipe Stomp 2:47
25. Beedle Um Bum 3:03
26. Selling That Stuff 2:59


Volume 2



By early 1932, the point at which this second volume in Document's series begins, Big Bill Broonzy was well established on the Chicago music scene; although his music was beginning to take on an urbanized flavor, his forté was still country-blues, and the opening tracks here -- "Mr. Conductor Man," "Too-Too Train Blues" and "Bull Cow Blues" among them -- are among his finest examples of the form. Of equal interest are the sides he subsequently recorded with his Jug Busters, a rather mysterious group which yielded just two tracks -- "Rukus Juice Blues" and "M and O Blues" -- but which pushed Broonzy further away from his rural roots; in all likelihood, the group also inaugurated his collaboration with the enigmatic yet renowned Black Bob, with whom he would cut a series of classic guitar and piano duets in the months to follow.-- by Jason Ankeny Tracks

1. You Do It (Steele Smith. vcl) 3:10
2. Mr. Conductor Man 3:02
3. Too-Too Train Blues (11605) 2:53
4. Worrying You Off My Mind--Part 1 3:07
5. Worrying You Off My Mind--Part 2 3:09
6. Shelby County Blues 3:19
7. Mistreatin' Mamma Blues (11609) 3:03
8. Bull Cow Blues 2:53
9. How You Want It Done? (11611) 2:54
10. Long Tall Mama 2:49
11. M and O Blues 3:13
12. Rukus Juice Blues 3:07
13. Friendless Blues 3:25
14. Milk Cow Blues 3:18
15. Hungry Man Blues 3:33
16. I'll Be Back Home Again 2:55
17. Bull Cow Blues--Part 2 3:36
18. Serve it to Me Right 3:27
19. Starvation Blues (80394) 3:26
20. Mississippi River Blues 2:43
21. At the Break of Day 3:00
22. I Want to Go Home 2:48
23. Hard Headed Woman 3:25
24. Dying Day Blues 3:00


Volume 3


 

Big Bill Broonzy's absorption of the urbanized Chicago blues style was essentially complete by the time of the 1934-35 recordings assembled here. The highlight is a highly productive session featuring the State Street Boys, a group featuring Broonzy alongside harpist Jazz Gillum, guitarist Carl Martin, pianist Black Bob and violinist Zeb Wright, whose dissonant, scraping style lends the combo a highly distinctive sound; their material is fascinatingly diverse, ranging from the train songs "Midnight Special" and "Mobile and Western Line" to the saucy "She Caught the Train" and the much-covered "Don't Tear My Clothes." Also with Black Bob, Broonzy continued recording more simplified guitar/piano duets -- their "Southern Blues" is a lovely and nostalgic reminiscence about life on the other side of the Mason-Dixon line, while "Good Jelly" ranks among his most lyrically inventive efforts.-- by Jason AnkenyTracks

BIG BILL
1. I Want to See My Baby 3:24
2. Serve it to Me Right 2:56
3. Dirty-No-Gooder 3:24
4. Let Her Go--She Don't Know 3:37
5. Hobo Blues 3:16
6. Prowlin' Ground Hog 3:05
7. C-C Rider (take A) 3:19
8. C-C Rider (take B) 3:20
STATE STREET BOYS
9. Mobile and Western Line 3:08
10. Crazy About You 2:58
11. Sweet to Mama 2:51
12. Rustelin' Man 3:11
13. She Caught the Train 3:06
14. Midnight Special 2:53
15. The Dozen 3:04
16. Don't Tear My Clothes 3:11
BIG BILL
17. The Southern Blues 3:37
18. Good Jelly 3:19
19. C and A Blues 2:59
20. Something Good 2:54
21. You May Need My Help Someday 3:06
22. Rising Sun Shine On 3:11


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Sunday, August 4, 2013

Buddy Guy - Rhythm & Blues - 2013.



Six-time Grammy Award winner and 2012 Kennedy Center Honoree Buddy Guy will release his new studio album Rhythm & Blueson July 30th on RCA Records. The follow-up to his 2010 Grammy Award winning album Living Proof, this double-disc masterpiece features first time studio collaborations with A-list artists Kid Rock, Keith Urban, Gary Clark, Jr., Beth Hart and Aerosmith members Steven Tyler, Joe Perry and Brad Whitford.

Produced by Grammy Award winning producer/songwriter and longtime collaborator Tom Hambridge (Skin Deep, Living Proof), Rhythm & Blues captures the 76 year-young Guy at the peak of his creativity. Replete with heartfelt vocals, straightforward lyrics and mesmerizing guitar licks, Rhythm & Blues not only exemplifies how blues continues to be the foundation of all genres of today's music, it also illustrates why Guy has been influential in the careers of Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix, Jeff Beck, Stevie Ray Vaughan and more.

The Rhythm disc includes rhythm and blues-style blues with deep grooves, such as the Junior Wells' 1960 hit "Messin' With The Kid" featuring Kid Rock, the touching "One Day Away" with Keith Urban, and "What You're Gonna Do About Me," a rousing duet with Beth Hart. Guy rounds out the disc with "Best In Town," "Whiskey Ghost," Guitar Slim's "Well I Done Got Over It" and more.

The Blues disc taps into the genre's rich history with "Meet Me In Chicago," "I Could Die Happy," "Never Gonna Change" and "All That Makes Me Happy Is The Blues." Aerosmith's Tyler, Perry and Whitford contribute to the musical lesson with "Evil Twin" while Gary Clark, Jr. joins Guy on "Blues Don t Care."

In a career that spans nearly 50 years with over 50 albums released, the incomparable Buddy Guy recently added the prestigious Kennedy Center Honors and NARM Chairman's Award for Sustained Creative Achievement to his long list of achievements. Guy is the recipient of 30 awards and accolades, including 6 Grammy Awards, 28 Blues Music Awards (formerly W. C. Handy Awards), Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction, the first annual Great Performer of Illinois Award, a Billboard Music Awards' Century Award for distinguished artistic achievement, the Presidential National Medal of Arts, in addition to being listed as one of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time by Rolling Stone.

TRACKLIST

Disc: 1
1. Best In Town
2. Justifyin'
3. I Go By Feel
4. Messin With The Kid (featuring Kid Rock)
5. What's Up With That Woman
6. One Day Away (featuring Keith Urban)
7. Well I Done Got Over It
8. What You Gonna Do About Me (featuring Beth Hart)
9. The Devil's Daughter
10. Whiskey Ghost
11. Rhythm - Inner Groove

Disc: 2
1. Meet Me In Chicago
2. Too Damn Bad
3. Evil Twin (featuring Steven Tyler, Joe Perry & Brad Whitford)
4. I Could Die Happy
5. Never Gonna Change
6. All That Makes Me Happy Is The Blues
7. My Mama Loved Me
8. Blues Don't Care (featuring Gary Clark, Jr.)
9. I Came Up Hard
10. Poison Ivy

Info:
MP3
185 MB
Password: mississippimoan

Link:
http://lix.in/-da4a0e

Saturday, August 3, 2013

Lurrie Bell - Blues In My Soul - 2013.


Biography by Bill Dahl:

Lurrie Bell was born on December 13, 1958, in Chicago. His famous father, harpist Carey Bell, had him working out on guitar as a wee lad. By 1977, he was recording with his dad and playing behind a variety of established stars, tabbed by many observers at the time as a sure star on the rise. But personal problems took their toll on his great potential; Bell's recorded output and live performances were inconsistent in the '80s and early '90s. Among the highlights of Bell's discography are three tracks in tandem with harpist Billy Branch under the Sons of Blues banner (Bell was a founding member of the band) from Alligator's first batch of 1978 Living Chicago Blues anthologies and a 1984 collaboration, Son of a Gun, with his old man for Rooster Blues. Then there's his set for Delmark, Mercurial Son, as bizarre a contemporary blues album as you're likely to encounter. Bell followed Mercurial Son with the more straightforward 700 Blues in spring 1997; The Blues Had a Baby appeared two years later. Let's Talk About Love (2007) and The Devil Ain't Got No Music (2012), both appeared on Bell's own record label Aria B.G. In 2013, he returned to Delmark with the release of Blues in My Soul, which celebrated the guitarist's straight-ahead Chicago blues roots.

Track List:

01. Hey Hey Baby [03:09]
02. Blues in My Soul [06:04]
03. I Feel so Good [04:14]
04. She's a Good 'Un [04:39]
05. 'Bout the Break of Day [06:12]
06. Going Away Baby [04:16]
07. 24 Hour Blues [03:56]
08. My Little Machine [05:30]
09. I Just Keep Loving Her [02:44]
10. T-Bone Blues Special [03:22]
11. Just the Blues [06:59]
12. South Side to Riverside [05:38]
13. If It's Too Late [03:51]
14. Blues Never Die [05:40]

Info:
FLAC
497 MB
Password: mississippimoan

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Clarence Gatemouth Brown - The Best Of A Blues Legend - 1995.



70's recordings by the man


Tracks:

1. Bogalusa Boogie Man 4:38
2. The Drifter 7:27
3. Loup Garou 3:25
4. Jelly, Jelly 4:54
5. Gate's On The Heat 5:10
6. Please Mr. Nixon 4:59
7. Goto My Mojo Working 4:32
8. Cajun Blues 3:34
9. "1:49 of Gate showing how not to start a take on time...." 1:48
10. Gate's Express 3:54
11. Breaux Bridge Rag 2:59
12. Louisian' 3:02
13. Rosalie 2:30
14. Birmingham 2:37
15. After The Band Is Gone 1:54

Info:
FLAC
350 MB
Password: mississippimoan

Link:
http://www.filefactory.com/file/5bq0b45kykap/n/CGNTBOABL_rar

Monday, July 29, 2013

Jimmie Vaughan - Plays More Blues, Ballads & Favorites - 2011.



Allmusic:

"If at first you succeed, do it again," seems to be Austin blues/R&B guitarist Jimmie Vaughan's motto, as he returns to the well that provided a hit for him only a year before this second volume's release. Since it took nearly nine years between albums before this, it's obvious that both the acceptance of the last set, and its concept, were something that resonated with him enough to bring the same band back for another batch of covers of cool obscurities from the past. Recording in mono -- oddly not noted on the sleeve notes -- and live in the studio provides a batch of hot-wired, energized performances that do justice to songs that were likely originally recorded under similar circumstances five or six decades ago. Only the most obsessive of blues fans will recognize some of the artists such as Jivin' Gene, Teddy Humphries, and Annie Laurie who first recorded these minor gems, let alone the songs themselves. Vaughan digs deep to unearth seldom heard, let alone covered, tracks associated with better-known figures like Ray Charles, Jimmy Liggins, and Hank Williams, Sr. He also revives another Jimmy Reed cover, "I'm a Love You," something he has been obsessed with after recording two albums of the bluesman's material riding shotgun to Omar Kent Dykes. Once again, Lou Ann Barton jumps on board to add her distinctive Southern voice in duet settings and even gets her picture on the cover, even though she only contributes to three tracks, one less than last time. A two-man horn section of saxists Doug James and Greg Piccolo, both ex-Roomful of Blues, brings the jump blues titles into full swing. Vaughan keeps his typically clipped solos sharp and punchy, using his instrument to punctuate rather than drive the attack. It sounds as loose and animated as studio sessions can be, with seemingly no overdubs to rob the music of its natural spontaneity. Liner notes explaining how Vaughan came in contact with, and was influenced by, these relatively lost gems would have gone a long way to help newcomers appreciate his motivation. Regardless, this remains a terrific, crackling listen and a great party album that sounds as rollicking in 2011 as it would have 50 years earlier.


Tracks:

01. I Ain't Never [03:02]
02. No Use Knocking [03:26]
03. Teardrop Blues [04:46]
04. I Hang My Head And Cry [03:40]
05. It's Been A Long Time [03:31]
06. Breaking Up Is Hard To Do [02:44]
07. What Makes You So Tough [03:36]
08. Greenback Dollar Bill [02:10]
09. I'm In The Mood For You [02:21]
10. I Ain't Gonna Do It No More [03:48]
11. Cried Like A Baby [03:53]
12. Oooh Oooh Oooh [03:58]
13. I Want To Love You [02:45]
14. The Rains Came [02:49]

Info:
FLAC
231 MB
Password: mississippimoan

Link:
http://www.filefactory.com/file/3xtu8j3dcb87/n/jvpmbbf_rar