Saturday, April 9, 2011

Charlie Musselwhite - Charley Musselwhite’s Southside Blues Band - Stand Back! - 1967






Review:

Vanguard may have spelled his name wrong (he prefers Charlie or Charles), but the word was out as soon as this solo debut was released: Here was a harpist every bit as authentic, as emotional, in some ways as adventuresome, as Paul Butterfield.

Similarly leading a Chicago band with a veteran Black rhythm section (Fred Below on drums, Bob Anderson on bass) and rock-influenced soloists (keyboardist Barry Goldberg, guitarist Harvey Mandel), Musselwhite played with a depth that belied his age — only 22 when this was cut! His gruff vocals were considerably more affected than they would become later (clearer, more relaxed), but his renditions of "Help Me," "Early in the Morning," and his own "Strange Land" stand the test of time.
He let his harmonica speak even more authoritatively on instrumentals like "39th and Indiana" (essentially "It Hurts Me Too" sans lyrics) and "Cha Cha the Blues," and his version of jazz arranger Duke Pearson's gospel-tinged "Cristo Redentor" has become his signature song — associated with Musselwhite probably more so than with trumpeter Donald Byrd, who originally recorded the song for Blue Note. Goldberg is in fine form (particularly on organ), but Mandel's snakey, stuttering style really stands out — notably on "Help Me," his quirky original "4 P.M.," and "Chicken Shack," where he truly makes you think your record is skipping.

Password and Links:
rukusjuice
FLAC - 24 Bit, 96 kHz Vinyl Rip - 902 Mb.
http://www.filefactory.com/file/c285934/n/cm.part1.rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/ca970d7/n/cm.part2.rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/ca97517/n/cm.part3.rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/ca97647/n/cm.part4.rar

Friday, April 8, 2011

Champion Jack Dupree - Blues from the Gutter - 1958 - REUPLOADED!


Review:

The 1958 masterwork album of Champion Jack Dupree's long and prolific career. Cut in New York (in stereo!) with a blasting band that included saxist Pete Brown and guitarist Larry Dale, the Jerry Wexler-produced Atlantic collection provides eloquent testimony to Dupree's eternal place in the New Orleans blues and barrelhouse firmament. There's some decidedly down-in-the-alley subject matter -- "Can't Kick the Habit," "T.B. Blues," a revival of "Junker's Blues" -- along with the stomping "Nasty Boogie" and treatments of the ancient themes "Stack-O-Lee" and "Frankie & Johnny."

Password and Link:
rukusjuice
FLAC - 725 Mb.
24 bit, 96 kHz Vinyl Rip.
http://www.filefactory.com/file/5hy4rdxnypfv/cjdbftg_rar

Wednesday, April 6, 2011

Marcia Ball - Roadside Attractions - 2011.


Review:

Marcia Ball, born on the Texas/Louisiana border, has long been a superb performer, delivering her swampy blend of zydeco, blues, and gritty R&B with all the force of a Saturday night locomotive, and through 12 albums, she has never let that energy go. Roadside Attractions, her fifth release for Alligator Records, is no exception -- it cooks and rattles and rocks with Ball's typical joyous energy and powerful piano. None of her many fans will be disappointed by this outing, but it is a little different for Ball in one respect -- for the first time on one of her albums she has either written or co-written every song on it, and all of them draw on her thousands of hours on the road bringing her infectious brand of swampy boogie to the world. Song after song here roars by in a lightning-soaked tumble of piano-driven words until it feels like her own personal diary of America tumbling past the tour bus window -- and it isn’t all barbecues, picnics, and big concert stages, either. Love is found, lost, and found again out on the road, and Ball captures the kinetic feel of all of that here, and she’s arguably never sung better, her voice full of the smoke of life on the road. You can tell she loves singing these songs. The opening track, “That’s How It Goes,” stomps with joy right out of the gate, and song after song builds things forward, with Ball's singing and lyrics on cuts like “Between Here and Kingdom Come” and “Believing in Love” in constant motion. The whole album is full of motion and life, and it’s easily Ball's best and most personal statement to date. But don’t worry -- she still knows that all paths lead to the dancefloor, and once there, as she sings on the album-closing “The Party’s Still Going On,” you better be ready to dance. This wonderful album will insist on it.

Password and Link:
rukusjuice
mp3 320 kbps - 96 Mb

Monday, April 4, 2011

Freddie King - Freddy King Gives You a Bonanza of Instrumentals - 1965.


Review:


King’s second all-instrumental album, Freddy King Gives You a Bonanza of Instrumentals, originally released in 1965 on King Records’ Federal subsidiary, continued the artist’s winning streak, with such memorable King originals as “Manhole,” “Freeway 75,” “Low Tide” and “Funnybone.” The 12-song LP demonstrates once again why King was one of his generation’s most revered electric guitarists.

Password and Link:
rukusjuice
Sundazed 180g mono LP vinyl rip  24 Bit, 96 kHz
FLAC - 365 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/ca8c3e6/n/fkboofin.rar

Sunday, April 3, 2011

Jimmy Liggins and His Drops of Joy - Recorded Between 1947 and 1953, Released in 1978.


Review:

The music of Jimmy Liggins differs greatly from his elder brother Joe's in many respects. Whereas Joe was a more schooled musician, Jimmy was harder, brasher and altogether from the rougher and cruder side of the street. This 25-track collection brings together all the notable tracks Jimmy recorded for Art Rupe's Specialty label between 1947 and 1954. The music Liggins made during his stay at the label produced several R&B hits, most notably the jump-blues perennial "Drunk" (complete with crudely overdubbed lead vocal) and the proto-rock & roll classic "Cadillac Boogie," which in turn provided the basis for Jackie Brenston's "Rocket 88."

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 128 kbps - 55 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b309ae3/n/jljlahdoj_rar

Albert Washington - Step It Up and Go - 1993.


Review:

Albert Washington's debut album Step It Up and Go is an impressive, soul-tinged collection of contemporary blues highlighted by Washington's powerful voice and knack for writing sturdy, memorable songs. Unlike some modern blues albums, Step It Up and Go has true grit to it, which brings true heart and soul to these songs and makes it a record well worth exploring.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 105 mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b309c4h/n/awsiuag.rar

Friday, April 1, 2011

Arbee Stidham - The Complete Recordings Vols 1 and 2 - 2004.




Arbee's Bio:


An exciting and expressive jazz-influenced blues vocalist, Arbee Stidham also plays alto sax, guitar and harmonica. His father Luddie Stidham worked in Jimme Lunceford's orchestra, while his uncle was a leader of the Memphis Jug Band. Stidham formed the Southern Syncopators and played various clubs in his native Arkansas in the '30s. He appeared on Little Rock radio station KARK and his band backed Bessie Smith on a Southern tour in 1930 and 1931. Stidham frequently performed in Little Rock and Memphis until he moved to Chicago in the '40s. Stidham recorded with Lucky Millinder's Orchestra for Victor in the '40s for Victor. He did his own sessions for Victor, Sittin' In, Checker, Abco, Prestige/Bluesville, Mainstream, and Folkways in the '50s and '60s, and appeared in the film The Bluesman in 1973. Stidham also made many festival and club appearances nationwide and internationally. He did occasional blues lectures at Cleveland State University in the '70s. 

Password and Links:
mississippimoan
FLAC - 361 Mb

http://www.filefactory.com/file/b30ac06/n/ascrvol1and2_part1_rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b30ae5h/n/ascrvol1and2_part2_rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b30af9f/n/ascrvol1and2_part3_rar

Sonny Landreth - The Road We're On - 2003.



Review:

Following a few years after Levee Town, an album tightly focused on a specific place and time, Landreth dedicates The Road We're On to the more intangible magic of the blues. The music this time scans a vast panorama, from the Texas shuffle of "All About You" and zydeco pulse of "Gone Pecan" through the tub-thump beat of some Bayou dive on "Juke Box Mamma." Aside from a couple of cuts on which he plays standard guitar, Landreth fills this album with wizardly slide work: A shimmering lick at the end of "A World Away" provides the most gorgeous sonic moment, though his extended jam on the environmental call to arms "Natural World" sustains a high level of intensity through several choruses. On most of these tracks Landreth performs in a raw trio setting, almost all the time recording live; on "Hell at Home" he even keeps the scratch vocal, rather than overdub a fresh version, because the four-beat groove, reminiscent of "Walking Blues" on Paul Butterfield's East-West, is so in-the-pocket. With more focus on the playing and less on studio polish than he's shown in years, Landreth affirms his mastery in all the feels of The Road We're On and, more importantly, reminds listeners that bottomless power still lives in the body of the blues.

Password and Links:
mississippimoan
FLAC - 375 Mb

http://www.filefactory.com/file/b30b0f9/n/sltrwo_part1_rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b30b332/n/sltrwo_part2_rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b30b375/n/sltrwo_part3_rar

Louisiana Red - Dead Stray Dog - 1976.


Bio:

Minter lost his parents early in life; His mother died of pneumonia shortly after his birth, and his father was lynched by the Ku Klux Klan when he was five. He was brought up by a series of relatives in various towns and cities. Red recorded for Chess in 1949, before joining the army. After leaving the army, he spent two years in the late 1950s playing with John Lee Hooker in Detroit. He recorded for Checker Records in 1952, billed as Rocky Fuller.
His first album, Lowdown Back Porch Blues, was recorded in New York with Tommy Tucker and released in 1963, with second album Seventh Son released later the same year. Louisiana Red released the single "I'm Too Poor To Die" for the Glover label in 1964. It peaked at Billboard position #117, and Cashbox R&B position 30 (Bilboard did not print standard R&B charts during 1964).
He maintained a busy recording and performing schedule through the 1990s, having done sessions for Chess, Checker, Atlas, Glover, Roulette, L&R and Tomato amongst others. In 1983 he won a W.C. Handy Award for Best Traditional Blues Male Artist.
He has lived in Hanover, Germany since 1981.
He has also made film appearances in Rockpalast (1976), Comeback (1982), Ballhaus Barmbek (1988), Red and Blues (2005) and Family Meeting (2008).
In 1994 Red fused the blues with the urban Greek music of the bouzouki player, Stelios Vamvakaris, on the album, Blues Meets Rembetika. He continues to tour, including regular returns to the US.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 93 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b30b4be/n/lrdsd_rar

Brownie McGhee - The Complete Brownie McGhee - Recorded Between 1940 and 1941, Released in 1994.


Review:

Well, complete as far as his pre-war country blues waxings for OKeh sans Sonny Terry (except for one or two where the whooping harpist provided accompaniment). Mc Ghee was working firmly in the Piedmont tradition by 1940, when he signed with OKeh and began cutting the 47 enlightening sides here, which represent some of the purest country blues he ever committed to posterity.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 210 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b4f18b5/n/bmgtcbmg_part1_rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b30b8g4/n/bmgtcbmg_part2_rar

Howlin' Wolf - Howlin' Wolf Rides Again - Recorded Between 1951 and 1952 , Released in 1993.


Review:

While both Bear Family sets deal with a largely unissued wealth of material, this collection is devoted in the main to all the Memphis recordings from 1951 and 1952 that saw the light of day on a number of Los Angeles-based labels owned by the Bihari Brothers, being issued and reissued and reissued again on a plethora of $1.98 budget albums. Featuring recordings done in Sam Phillips' Memphis Recording Service and surreptitious sessions recorded by a young Ike Turner in makeshift studios, these 18 sides are the missing piece of the puzzle in absorbing Wolf's early pre-Chess period. It also helps that this just happens to be some of the nastiest sounding blues ever recorded. With no tracks being duplicated from the two Bear Family Memphis Days volumes, and sonics far surpassing all previous issues of this material (every last one of them horribly marred by an annoying 60 cycle hum), this is an essential part of any Wolf collection. Alternate-take freaks will revel in the inclusion of two extra takes of "Riding in the Moonlight" from an earlier and different session than the issued version also included. While not quite as essential as his first two Chess albums (and if you were making a judgement call on just passionate performances alone, even that would be debatable), this is definitely the next stop along the way in absorbing the raw genius of Howlin' Wolf.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 128 kbps - 46 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b30d28f/n/hwra.rar

Frank Frost - Harpin' On It - 2002.



Review:

WestSide's 13-track collection Harpin' on It: The Complete Jewel Recordings compiles all of the songs Frank Frost cut for the Louisiana label in the mid-'60s. While these sides aren't as down-and-dirty as his earlier material for Sun, they're still enjoyable, revved-up juke joint blues. If anything, he stretches the form a little bit here, getting a little funkier with the rhythms, a little rockier in the guitar, and all the production sounds a bit more modern, more like the mid-'60s (which, ironically enough, means it doesn't sound as timeless as his earlier recordings). Throughout it all, Frost's great harp is front and center, and his playing is always first-rate, even when the material is a little pedestrian. Fortunately, he hit the mark more often than not while on Jewel -- most notably on instrumentals, plus the great Slim Harpo takeoff, "My Back Scratcher" -- which is why this is worth hearing.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 192 kbps - 54 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b30d7ch/n/ffhoitcjr_rar

Albert Washington - Blues and Soul Man - Recorded Between 1967 and 1970 - Released in 1999.



Review:

Washington may have been a journeyman at what he did, but he was at the very top of the journeyman class, and what he did--a hybrid of blues and soul--is not as overmined a genre as many blues styles are. That means that if you like blues-soul crossover, you will almost certainly like this compilation of late-'60s and early-'70s sides, which represent the peak of Washington as a recording artist. Most of these were done for Fraternity from 1967-1970, and show him comfortable in deep gospelly Southern soul grooves ("Doggin' Me Around"), quasi-Sam Cooke pop-soul ("A Woman Is a Funny Thing"), and party-tempo blues-soul hybrids that sometimes show a B.B. King influence. The material is more soul than blues; the blues bite is usually supplied by the sharp guitar licks (sometimes played by the great Lonnie Mack), the soul embellished by Washington's cheery, uplifting vocals. The exact tracks featuring Mack are not precisely identified, but his burning, slightly distorted tone is certainly on "Turn on the Bright Lights." Three of the 25 tracks were previously unissued, and in addition to the Fraternity material there are a couple of subsequent singles on Jewel from 1971 and 1973.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 136 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b30d980/n/awbandsm_rar

Arbee Stidham - Tired Of Wandering - 1960.


Review:

Over the years, the term R&B has been used to describe everything from the 1950s doo wop of the Five Satins to the hip-hop-influenced urban contemporary of Erykah Badu and R. Kelly -- in other words, a variety of African-American popular music with roots in the blues. Arbee Stidham was exactly the sort of singer who thrived in the R&B or "race" market after World War II; although essentially a bluesman, he wasn't a blues purist who embraced the 12-bar format 100 percent of the time. But his mixture of blues, jazz, and gospel made him quite popular among what were considered rhythm & blues audiences in the 1940s and 1950s. Recorded for Prestige's Bluesville label in 1960 -- eight years before Stidham's death -- Tired of Wandering is among his finest albums. This session, which boasts King Curtis on tenor sax, doesn't cater to blues purists; while some of the tunes have 12 bars, others don't. Regardless, the feeling of the blues enriches everything on the CD; that is true whether Stidham is turning his attention to Big Joe Turner's "Last Goodbye Blues" or revisiting his 1948 hit, "My Heart Belongs to You." Equally triumphant is Brownie McGhee's "Pawn Shop," which is associated with Piedmont country blues but gets a big-city makeover from Stidham. Like Jimmy Witherspoon -- someone he inspires comparisons to -- Stidham demonstrates that the blues can be sophisticated, polished, and jazz-influenced without losing their grit. The big-voiced singer/guitarist was born in Arkansas, but Chicago was his adopted home -- and the Windy City had a definite influence on his work. Anyone who has spent a lot of time savoring jazz-influenced bluesmen like Witherspoon and Percy Mayfield owes it to himself/herself to give Tired of Wandering a very close listen.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 256 Kbps - 54 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b30hcg0/n/astow_rar

Big Jack Johnson - Live In Chicago - 1997.






Review:

Mississippi bluesman Johnson comes North to play in Chicago and the results are indeed satisfying. Taken from two different shows at two different venues (Hothouse and Buddy Guy's Legends) over a period of two years ('94 and '95), Johnson is ably backed by Aaron Burton's band with Lester "Mad Dog" Davenport contributing some nice harp on the set from the Legends show. Johnson keeps the set lists jumping, from straight-ahead blues ("Sweet Sixteen," "Black Rooster," "Fightin' Woman," Z.Z. Hill's "The Blues Is Alright") to Mississippi-juke-joint dance numbers (Hank Ballard's "The Twist," "Night Train") and even the stray 'hillbilly blues' number like "Pistol Packin' Mama" and Ivory Joe Hunter's "Since I Met You Baby." Sound is dodgy in spots, but Johnson's palpable energy comes through just fine.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 128 kbps - 58 mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b30he97/n/bjjlic_rar

Floyd Dixon - Marshall Texas Is My Home - 1991.


Review:

Floyd Dixon landed at Art Rupe's Specialty label in 1953, his music jumping harder than ever. These 22 tracks rate with his best; the collection is full of rarities and previously unissued items, many featuring the wailing tenor sax of Carlos Bermudez in lusty support of the pianist. By 1957, when he momentarily paused at Ebb Records, Dixon could do a pretty fair breathless imitation of Little Richard, as the scorching "Oooh Little Girl" definitively proves. Also includes Dixon's best-known number, the often-covered rocker "Hey Bartender" (first out on Atlantic's Cat subsidiary in 1954).

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 128 kbps - 49 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b3104d4/n/fd_rar

Big Jack Johnson - The Oil Man - 1987.


Review:

A true legend in the Delta, Big Jack has gained national attention in the last decade. This solo debut is from 1987 is tremendous-- he's got a booming yet warm voice like Albert King and a ferocious lead/rhythm guitar approach that just astounds. The set list is a mix of originals and covers (even one by Bob Wills-- Big Jack counts country music has a key influence in his music) and the tour de force rendition of "Catfish Blues" is unforgettable. With Frank Frost on piano from the Jelly Roll Kings, this album is a must for initiates to Big Jack or fans who only know his '90's releases.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 192 kbps - 65 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b310630/n/bjjtom_rar

Guy Davis - Butt Naked Free - 2000.


Review:

Making sure that country-blues starts the 21st century off on the right foot, Guy Davis' Butt Naked Free, whose title was inspired by the comments of Davis' young son, is one of the most accomplished statements the genre has offered in a few years. Picking up where 1998's You Don't Know My Mind left off, Davis once again has decided to fill out his sound, but this time adding touches of mandolin, organ and accordion, with the results being altogether more satisfying and never sounding even slightly overproduced. Where Davis on his previous album sounded, at times, unsure of his new direction, Butt Naked Free rocks with a loose liveliness, still allowing Davis' derivative yet idiosyncratic sound to shine through. "Waiting on the Cards to Fall" and "Never Met No Woman Treats Me Like You Do," the latter with Levon Helm contributing drums and mandolin, showcase how well Davis' sound fills out and offers the unique experience of hearing what it might have sounded like if Mance Lipscomb or Reverend Gary Davis had ever recorded with full-band accompaniment. Ballads like "Let Me Stay a While" and the narrative "Sugar Belle Blue" are some of the strongest Davis has written and, if anything, benefit considerably from the more filled out sound. Of course, Davis still delivers more than a few of his stripped-down solo country-blues tunes with the humorous "High Flying Rocket," the mean slide playing on "Come On Sally Hitch a Ride," and the gorgeous instrumental "The Place Where I'm From (Butt Naked Free)." More than anything, Butt Naked Free shows that Guy Davis is still more than happy to carry the banner of country-blues, yet remains able to add to the dialogue of the genre and put his own stamp on it in the process.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 192 kbps - 59 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b3107ab/n/gdbnf_rar

Big Chief Ellis - Featuring Tarheel Slim, Brownie McGhee and John Cephas - 1977.


Review:

Some rare late-period blues from two very underrated New York musicians. Big Chief Ellis and Tarheel Slim weren't the greatest technical singers, but each was a fine interpreter, and that makes this late-'70s session quite instructive.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 256 kbps - 102 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b310a3c/n/bce_rar

Earl Hooker - Blues Guitar: The Chief and Age sessions 1959- 1963.


Review:

Widespread respect for Earl Hooker, one of the unsung giants of the blues, is long overdue, and his rather limited available discography belies a great original talent. P-Vine Japan has attempted to put this right with , an intelligent and authoritative collection of Hooker's early-'60s heyday, containing instrumental classics such as "Blue Guitar" and " Blues in D Natural." Both sound quality and packaging supersede all previous reissues of this work and, as such, this release becomes perhaps the cornerstone of any Earl Hooker collection.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 158 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b310e8e/n/ehbgtcandas_rar

R.L. Burnside - First Recordings - Recorded Between 1967 and 1968, Released in 2003.



Review:

At the time these tracks were cut, 1967 and 1968, R.L. Burnside  was working on a plantation in Coldwater, MS, cutting silage. Folklorist George Mitchell was on a mission to record unknown blues singers down South. Mitchell heard about Burnside and paid him a visit, asking if he could record him. That night Mitchell returned to Burnside's place with a case of beer and some whiskey. Ten months later, Burnside had his first release. While these 14 tracks didn't jump start Burnside's career, they are stark, organic, and timeless, just Burnside and his acoustic guitar running down mainly traditional material that he arranged. This is an absolute treasure for Burnside aficionados and casual blues listeners alike.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 192 kbps - 50 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b310f2a/n/rlbfr_rar

Howlin' Wolf - The Complete Recordings - 1951, 1969 - 7 cd Box Set.


Howlin' Wolf Biography:

In the history of the blues, there has never been anyone quite like the Howlin' Wolf. Six foot three and close to 300 pounds in his salad days, the Wolf was the primal force of the music spun out to its ultimate conclusion. A Robert Johnson may have possessed more lyrical insight, a Muddy Waters more dignity, and a B.B. King certainly more technical expertise, but no one could match him for the singular ability to rock the house down to the foundation while simultaneously scaring its patrons out of its wits.

He was born in West Point, MS, and named after the 21st President of the United States (Chester Arthur). His father was a farmer and Wolf took to it as well until his 18th birthday, when a chance meeting with Delta blues legend Charley Patton changed his life forever. Though he never came close to learning the subtleties of Patton's complex guitar technique, two of the major components of Wolf's style (Patton's inimitable growl of a voice and his propensity for entertaining) were learned first hand from the Delta blues master. The main source of Wolf's hard-driving, rhythmic style on harmonica came when Aleck "Rice" Miller (Sonny Boy Williamson) married his half-sister Mary and taught him the rudiments of the instrument. He first started playing in the early '30s as a strict Patton imitator, while others recall him at decade's end rocking the juke joints with a neck-rack harmonica and one of the first electric guitars anyone had ever seen. After a four-year stretch in the Army, he settled down as a farmer and weekend player in West Memphis, AR, and it was here that Wolf's career in music began in earnest.

By 1948, he had established himself within the community as a radio personality. As a means of advertising his own local appearances, Wolf had a 15-minute radio show on KWEM in West Memphis, interspersing his down-home blues with farm reports and like-minded advertising that he sold himself. But a change in Wolf's sound that would alter everything that came after was soon in coming because when listeners tuned in for Wolf's show, the sound was up-to-the-minute electric. Wolf had put his first band together, featuring the explosive guitar work of Willie Johnson, whose aggressive style not only perfectly suited Wolf's sound but aurally extended and amplified the violence and nastiness of it as well. In any discussion of Wolf's early success both live, over the airwaves, and on record, the importance of Willie Johnson cannot be overestimated.

Wolf finally started recording in 1951, when he caught the ear of Sam Phillips, who first heard him on his morning radio show. The music Wolf made in the Memphis Recording Service studio was full of passion and zest and Phillips simultaneously leased the results to the Bihari Brothers in Los Angeles and Leonard Chess in Chicago. Suddenly, Howlin' Wolf had two hits at the same time on the R&B charts with two record companies claiming to have him exclusively under contract. Chess finally won him over and as Wolf would proudly relate years later, "I had a 4,000 dollar car and 3,900 dollars in my pocket. I'm the onliest one drove out of the South like a gentleman." It was the winter of 1953 and Chicago would be his new home.

When Wolf entered the Chess studios the next year, the violent aggression of the Memphis sides was being replaced with a Chicago backbeat and, with very little fanfare, a new member in the band. Hubert Sumlin proved himself to be the Wolf's longest-running musical associate. He first appears as a rhythm guitarist on a 1954 session, and within a few years' time his style had fully matured to take over the role of lead guitarist in the band by early 1958. In what can only be described as an "angular attack," Sumlin played almost no chords behind Wolf, sometimes soloing right through his vocals, featuring wild skitterings up and down the fingerboard and biting single notes. If Willie Johnson was Wolf's second voice in his early recording career, then Hubert Sumlin would pick up the gauntlet and run with it right to the end of the howler's life.

By 1956, Wolf was in the R&B charts again, racking up hits with "Evil" and "Smokestack Lightnin'." He remained a top attraction both on the Chicago circuit and on the road. His records, while seldom showing up on the national charts, were still selling in decent numbers down South. But by 1960, Wolf was teamed up with Chess staff writer Willie Dixon, and for the next five years he would record almost nothing but songs written by Dixon. The magic combination of Wolf's voice, Sumlin's guitar, and Dixon's tunes sold a lot of records and brought the 50-year-old bluesman roaring into the next decade with a considerable flourish. The mid-'60s saw him touring Europe regularly with "Smokestack Lightnin'" becoming a hit in England some eight years after its American release. Certainly any list of Wolf's greatest sides would have to include "I Ain't Superstitious," "The Red Rooster," "Shake for Me," "Back Door Man," "Spoonful," and "Wang Dang Doodle," Dixon compositions all. While almost all of them would eventually become Chicago blues standards, their greatest cache occurred when rock bands the world over started mining the Chess catalog for all it was worth. One of these bands was the Rolling Stones, whose cover of "The Red Rooster" became a number-one record in England. At the height of the British Invasion, the Stones came to America in 1965 for an appearance on ABC-TV's rock music show, Shindig. Their main stipulation for appearing on the program was that Howlin' Wolf would be their special guest. With the Stones sitting worshipfully at his feet, the Wolf performed a storming version of "How Many More Years," being seen on his network-TV debut by an audience of a few million. Wolf never forgot the respect the Stones paid him, and he spoke of them highly right up to his final days.

Dixon and Wolf parted company by 1964 and Wolf was back in the studio doing his own songs. One of the classics to emerge from this period was "Killing Floor," featuring a modern backbeat and a incredibly catchy guitar riff from Sumlin. Catchy enough for Led Zeppelin to appropriate it for one of their early albums, cheerfully crediting it to themselves in much the same manner as they had done with numerous other blues standards. By the end of the decade, Wolf's material was being recorded by artists including the Doors, the Electric Flag, the Blues Project, Cream, and Jeff Beck. The result of all these covers brought Wolf the belated acclaim of a young, white audience. Chess' response to this was to bring him into the studio for a "psychedelic" album, truly the most dreadful of his career. His last big payday came when Chess sent him over to England in 1970 to capitalize on the then-current trend of London Session albums, recording with Eric Clapton on lead guitar and other British superstars. Wolf's health was not the best, but the session was miles above the earlier, ill-advised attempt to update Wolf's sound for a younger audience.

As the '70s moved on, the end of the trail started coming closer. By now Wolf was a very sick man; he had survived numerous heart attacks and was suffering kidney damage from an automobile accident that sent him flying through the car's windshield. His bandleader Eddie Shaw firmly rationed Wolf to a meager half-dozen songs per set. Occasionally some of the old fire would come blazing forth from some untapped wellspring, and his final live and studio recordings show that he could still tear the house apart when the spirit moved him. He entered the Veterans Administration Hospital in 1976 to be operated on, but never survived it, finally passing away on January 10th of that year.

But his passing did not go unrecognized. A life-size statue of him was erected shortly after in a Chicago park. Eddie Shaw kept his memory and music alive by keeping his band, the Wolf Gang, together for several years afterward. A child-education center in Chicago was named in his honor and in 1980 he was elected to the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame. In 1991, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. A couple of years later, his face was on a United States postage stamp. Live performance footage of him exists in the CD-ROM computer format. Howlin' Wolf is now a permanent part of American history.

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Sonny Boy Williamson - The Original Sonny Boy Williamson - Recorded Between 1937 and 1939, Released in 2007.


Review:

JSP is a reissue label sent by angels to alleviate suffering and dispel ignorance in the world. We know this because JSP has done a fantastic job of compiling remastered blues, jazz, gospel, country, Cajun and western swing recordings in reasonably priced four-CD sets packed with loads of discographical information and insightful liner notes. Released in 2007, JSP's 100-track intensive tribute to Chicago blues harmonica legend John Lee Sonny Boy Williamson  (1914-1948) zeroes in on his earliest recorded works, dating from the years 1937-1939. (This is only volume one!) Rather than confining the scope of the retrospective exclusively to 41 titles by musicians with whom he hung out, gigged, and recorded. These are guitarists Big Joe Williams, "Jackson" Joe Williams, Robert Lee "Rambling Bob" McCoy, Henry Townsend, and Elijah Jones, as well as blues mandolin man Yank Rachell and boogie-woogie pianist Speckled Red. Additional support was provided by second chair mandolinist Will Hatcher and the great Big Bill Broonzy. This is where Chicago's modern blues harmonica tradition really began. All of the genre's essential components are firmly in place; the songs tell us everything that needed to be said about living, loving, working, scuffling, and trying to survive in a city whose working class population was largely committed to the meat packing industry during the years immediately preceding the Second World War. This was Sonny BOy Williamson I, not to be confused with Sonny Boy Williamson II, an entirely different individual who lived long enough to make records with British rockers during the '60s. Williamson I was beaten to death on the way home from a gig on the first of June 1948. Posthumously honored and widely imitated, his potent musical legacy is finally getting the sort of careful attention that it has always deserved.

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mp3 224 kbps - 530 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b312b88/n/tosbw_part1_rar
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The Legendary Josh White , Recorded in the '60s, Released in 1998.



Review:

This release highlights 18 songs cut by Josh White during the early '60s. Accompanied by his solo acoustic guitar and a string bass, he goes through a range of songs, from his concert favorite "One Meat Ball" to more generic traditional numbers such as the guitar virtuoso showcase "Prison Bound." White also performs contemporary pieces with which he is associated, including the Earl Robinson and Allen Lewis song "House I Live In" (which became much more famous in the hands of Frank Sinatra), jazz pieces like "Miss Otis Regrets," and even his version of "Waltzing Matilda," which in its tempo and accents is perhaps the most stylized rendition ever heard. The material shows off White's range to exceptionally good advantage, and this is as fine a representation of the music that made him famous in the 1960s as any single CD collection currently available.

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mp3 128 kbps - 46 Mb
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Tarheel Slim - No Time At All - 1974.


Review:

Tarheel Slim made some great almost-black rockabilly records for Bobby Robinson in the early '60s, but these 1975 recordings for Pete Lowery's Trix label are loose, informal, and largely acoustic performances. The good news is that they're every bit as engaged as the earlier, rockier Fire sides, full of involved vocals and plucky guitar work that veers between single-note clusters and fleet fingerpicked runs. For all the rough hewness of these recordings, Slim's personality comes through in full force, which makes for one powerful blues album in the bargain

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mp3  320 kbps - 128 Mb
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Hop Wilson and His Buddies - Steel Guitar Flash - 1988.


Review:

Although the majority of the recordings collected here already show up on Bullseye Blues' 1993 reissue Houston Ghetto Blues, this is the one to get. The main reason for this is the inclusion of all the known extant tracks cut in the '50s for the Lake Charles, LA, Goldband label, where Wilson's versions of "Chicken Stuff" and "Rockin' in the Coconut Top" became tri-state biggies, giving him his 15 seconds of fame and influencing the likes of a young Johnny Winter and other young Texan slide-slingers in the process. With his drummer/sometimes-vocalist King Ivory Lee Semien banging the daylights out of a set that sounds like Salvation Army rejects (check out the floor-tom intro on the Goldband version of "Rockin' in the Coconut Top"), a string bass played by the ubiquitous "Ice Water" Jones, and a crackling, wires sticking out of it steel guitar going to places Elmore James could only think of after watching a bad sci-fi movie, Hop Wilson's dour singing delivery combined with his wild-ass playing becomes a whole genre of blues in and of itself and one well worth investigating. With a full generous 29 tracks aboard (including Wilson and the boys backing up Fenton Robinson and Larry Davis on newly discovered cuts) covering all the Goldband, Trey, and Ivory takes known to exist, this is now the definitive Hop Wilson collection and reason enough to start haunting the blues import bins to track it down. Programming tip: For full frontal assault, program up tracks 13 and 25-29 first and prepare yourself for something really special. There was only one Hop Wilson and here's where you check in to get his message.

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mp3 160 kbps - 84 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b3cfbf8/n/hwsgf_rar

Taj Mahal - Taj Mahal - 1968.


Review:

Taj Mahal's debut album was a startling statement in its time and has held up remarkably well. Recorded in August of 1967, it was as hard and exciting a mix of old and new blues sounds as surfaced on record in a year when even a lot of veteran blues artists (mostly at the insistence of their record labels) started turning toward psychedelia. The guitar virtuosity, embodied in Taj Mahal's slide work (which had the subtlety of a classical performance), Jesse Ed Davis's lead playing, and rhythm work by Ry Cooder and Bill Boatman, is of the neatly stripped-down variety that was alien to most records aiming for popular appeal, and the singer himself approached the music with a startling mix of authenticity and youthful enthusiasm. The whole record is a strange and compelling amalgam of stylistic and technical achievements -- filled with blues influences of the 1930s and 1940s, but also making use of stereo sound separation and the best recording technology. The result was numbers like Sleepy John Estes' "Diving Duck Blues," with textures resembling the mix on the early Cream albums, while "The Celebrated Walkin' Blues" (even with Cooder's animated mandolin weaving its spell on one side of the stereo mix) has the sound of a late '40s Chess release by Muddy Waters. Blind Willie McTell ("Statesboro Blues") and Robert Johnson ("Dust My Broom") are also represented, in what had to be one of the most quietly, defiantly iconoclastic records of 1968.

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mp3 256 kbps - 80 Mb
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Junior Parker, James Cotton and Pat Hare - Mistery Train Recorded Between 1952 and 1954, Released in 1990.


Review:


This excellent little compilation features at least one extant take of everything Junior and his original band, the Blue Flames, recorded at Sun Records between 1952 to 1954. His debut single for the label and his first hit, the classic "Feelin' Good" is aboard as well as the equally fine (but originally unissued) "Feelin' Bad." His leanings toward smoother Roy Brown stylings are evident with tracks like "Fussing and Fighting Blues" and "Sitting and Thinking," but the follow-up to his first Sun single, the original version of "Mystery Train" and two takes of the flip side, "Love My Baby," are the must-hears on this collection. Fleshing out Parker's meager output for Sun are essential early tracks from James Cotton. Cotton doesn't blow harp on any of these, but the sax-dominated "My Baby," and especially "Cotton Crop Blues" and "Hold Me in Your Arms" with Pat Hare on super distorted blistering guitar are Memphis-'50s blues at its apex. Hare himself also rounds out the compilation with two tracks, the prophetic "I'm Gonna Murder My Baby" (Hare did exactly that and spent the rest of his life behind bars as a result) and the previously unissued "Bonus Pay." Don't let the short running time of this CD stop you from picking this one up; the music is beyond excellent.

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mp3 256 kbps - 65 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b31659e/n/jpjcphmt_rar

Willie Foster - I Found Joy - 1979.


Tracks:

1. Why Do You Treat Me So Mean 4:34
2. Janie On My Mind 7:22
3. Everyday I Have the Blues 5:09
4. Achin' All Over 3:45
5. Tell Me 4:00
6. Blues Is Just a Feelin' 5:21
7. Big Boss Man 3:28
8. Where Can She Be 4:00
9. If You Love Me 5:19
10. Ready for the Blues 3:48
11. Goin' to Get My Baby 2:24
12. I Found Joy 6:27

Personnel:
Willie Foster - Vocals,Harp
Bobby Mack - Guitars
Mark Goodwin - Piano,Hammond Organ
Bret Coats - Bass
Dan Frezek - Drums
Jimmy Pate - Drums

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FLAC - 330 Mb
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Willie Foster - Live at Airport Grocery - 2000.


Bio:

At first sight, the appearance of this legendary bluesman can fool you. Willie Foster is 77 years old, confined to a wheelchair, and legally blind, but to see him play is to know what the blues is all about. Mempho Records is proud to announce "Live at Airport Grocery," the latest United States release from Willie Foster. Recorded live to 12 Track analog, "Live at Airport Grocery" is a testament to the soul and love Willie foster has for his Music. Airport Grocery is a small Bar-B-Q juke joint in Cleveland, Mississippi. It is one of those places we have all seen, but often overlook; a great place to get some hot food and see live performances from some of the best kept secrets the South has to offer. "Live at Airport Grocery" is just such a performance that is captured and reproduced for everyone to enjoy. Willie Foster's performances unveil his life as a bluesman. As he says "The blues is a burden. You've got to live the blues to know the blues." From being born in a cotton field of the Mississippi delta to loosing loved ones, this recording reveals and expresses his innermost feelings. Track 2, "Love Everybody" speaks for itself. On track 8, he sings about his departed "Dear Old Dad," and nearly brings you to tears with his wailing harmonica on track 3, "Honey Ain't Sweet." An authentic bluesman whose career has spanned the better part of this century, Willie Foster is living history. Listen for yourself and be taken back to a time when all that mattered was a rhythm and a song.

Tracks:
1. Just Messin' Round 4:13
2. Love Everybody 5:45
3. Honey Ain't Sweet 7:19
4. Hoochie Coochie Man 6:32
5. Janie On My Mind 5:37
6. Promise Me Love 5:07
7. Goin to St. Louis 5:33
8. My Dear Old Dad 8:18
9. Willie's Boogie 4:06

Personnel:
Willie Foster - Vocals,Harp
Charlie Ricker - Rhythm & Lead Guitar
Skeeter Provis - Rhythm & Lead Guitar
Donnie Brown - Bass
Frank Vick - Drums
Larry Wright - Drums

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Frank Frost - Live In Lucerne - 2004.

Review
This is Frank's last recording and it is his only live album. It was recorded on his 1998 European tour at the Lucerne Blues Festival in Switzerland and features producer, guitarist Fred James and ex-Amazing Rhythm Aces bass player Jeff Davis, along with longtime drummer Sam Carr.
Frank passed away in 1999. He was considered to be the greatest of the second generation of Delta Blues harmonica players. He began his career, though, as a backing guitarist for Robert Nighthawk and Sonny Boy Williamson (II). It was Sonny Boy who inspired him to pick up the harmonica and the influence is obvious. He and drummer Sam Carr formed The Jelly Roll Kings in the late 50s as a duo with Frank playing guitar and harp on a rack. They soon added Jack Johnson on guitar and bass and it was this unit that recorded for Sun/Phillips, Jewel and Earwig.
Frank hooked up with Fred James and Bluesland Productions in the late 80s and together they recorded for Appaloosa/Ichiban, Evidence and Hightone. Look for more from Frank Frost on R.O.A.D. Records in the coming years.

Tracks:
1. You Better Watch Yourself 4:16
2. Deep Blues 4:52
3. Janie's On My Mind 7:05
4. Scratch My Back 4:29
5. I Didn't Know 4:25
6. Frank's Mambo 4:07
7. St. Louis Serenade 6:28
8. Jelly Roll King 3:59
9. Lucky To Be Living 5:45
10. Helena Boogie 5:05

Personnel:
Frank Frost - Harp,Vocal
Sam Carr - Drums
Fred James - Guitar
Jeff Davis - Bass
Kenny Brown - 2nd Guitar on "I Didn't Know"

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V.A. - Reefer Songs: Original Jazz and Blues Vocals - 1989.


Review:

This LP was the very first release by the Stash label and, as with its first dozen or so collections, it features vintage material that deals with illicit subject matter. Many of the best marijuana and drug-based recordings are on this set including Stuff Smith's "Here Comes the Man with the Jive" (which features some hot Jonah Jones trumpet), Trixie Smith's "Jack I'm Mellow," Barney Bigard's "Sweet Marijuana Brown" (which has Art Tatum on piano), Andy Kirk's "All the Jive Is Gone" and Harry "The Hipster" Gibson's classic "Who Put the Benzedrine in Mrs. Murphy's Ovaltine?" Other performers include Cab Calloway, Benny Goodman, Buster Bailey, Sidney Bechet, the Harlem Hamfats, Chick Webb and Clarence Williams. Some of this material has since been reissued on CD but the original set is still the best.

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mp3 192 kbps - 95 Mb
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Doctor Clayton - Doctor Clayton , 1935- 1947, Released in 1993.

Review:

Pairing Doctor Clayton and Sunnyland Slim on the same compilation makes good sense for a number of reasons. Generally speaking, both men were influential participants in the Chicago blues scene of the 1940s. More specifically, they had a lot of players in common, including pianist Blind John Davis, guitarists Robert Lockwood and Big Bill Broonzy, and bassist Ransom Knowling. The most obvious similarity between Doctor Clayton and young Sunnyland Slim was their extroverted vocal delivery, bravely introduced by Clayton during the years 1935-1942 and revived with a vengeance by Sunnyland in 1947. Clayton's part of the package begins with "Peter's Blues" and its flipside, the naughty "Yo Yo Jive," recorded in July 1935. Nine selections from 1941 include an outspoken report on the Nazi occupation of Europe and a fine cover version of Walter Brown and Jay McShann's "Confessin' the Blues." Unfortunately Clayton drank himself to death in January 1947, derailing a stalled career that otherwise could have led to his success as one of the great extroverts of rhythm & blues and rock & roll. When Victor released the records cut at Sunnyland's session of December 10, 1947, they billed him as "Doctor Clayton's Buddy." This was actually based in fact; the two men knew each other and ran with the same crowd. Furthermore, they sounded a bit alike, as Sunnyland honored his deceased colleague by adapting Clayton's hollering and screaming technique to suit his own needs. In this way, both men broke the ice and paved the way for rowdy rockers like Wynonie Harris, Professor Longhair, Little Richard and Screamin' Jay Hawkins. Clayton's complete works (with the exception of a tiny bit of material from 1946) were reissued by Document Records in 1994. Sunnyland's work from the 1940s has been exhaustively revisited by both the Classics and JSP labels. This little Story of the Blues sampler from 1993 is an excellent way to enjoy both artists and to compare their extraordinary styles. Feel free to scream along if the feeling comes and gets you.

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mp3 - 90 Mb
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Tarheel Slim - The Red Robin and Fifer Years - 1990.


Review:
Slim was quite an eclectic soul during his 1950s tenure with Bobby Robinson's Red Robin and Fire imprints (as this set conclusively shows). New York blues, pop/R&B duets with Little Ann, even blistering rockabilly-tinged outings ("Number 9 Train," and "Wildcat Tamer") were all well within the versatile guitarist's stylistic scope.

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mp 3 96 kbps - 35 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b318521/n/tstrrandfy_rar

Robert Lockwood Jr. - Plays Robert and Robert - 1982.



Review:

Lockwood in a beautifully recorded solo context (cut in France in 1982 for Black & Blue), doing what he does best -- his own songs and those of his legendary mentor, Robert Johnson. Purists may quiver at Lockwood's use of the 12-string guitar as his primary axe, but he long ago made the instrument his own blues tool of choice, and he handles its nuances expertly. 
 
Tracks:

1-Rambling On My Mind
2-Kind Hearted Woman
3-Walking Blues
4-I'm A Steady Rolling Man
5-Sweet Home Chicago
6-Little Queen Of Spades
7-Western Horizon
8-She Is Sweet and Low
9-Little Boy Blue
10-Lockwood's Boogie
11-Take A Walk With Me
12-See See Rider
13-Sweet Home Chicago (Alternate Take)

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mp3 128 kbps - 40 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b31858g/n/rljrprandr_rar

Johnny Ace - Memorial Album - 1955.



Review:

In the weeks and months following Johnny Ace's [aka John Marshall Alexander Jr.] tragic passing on Christmas Eve 1954, demand for his songs was at an all-time high. The resulting Memorial Album (1955) gathered a baker's dozen of Ace's most memorable selections, documented between the spring of 1952 and the summer of 1954. There are no unissued numbers on the disc, as each of the tracks had previously surfaced on a variety of 78s. However concurrent audiences no doubt saw this as an opportunity to obtain any of the platters they may have previously missed. Moreover, the exclusion of the prominent Top Ten R&B singles "Cross My Heart" and "Saving My Love for You" suggests Memorial Album was not conceived as a sort of comprehensive anthology. Ace (piano) originally formed his Beal Streeters along with fellow ex-B.B. King sidemen Earl Forest (drums) and Adolph "Billy" Duncan (sax). Their inaugural outing was held in the studios of Memphis radio station WDIA and producing, among other things "My Song," a deviation of Ruth Brown's "So Long." It shot to number one and was backed with the rabble rousin' R&B thumper "Follow the Rule." Listening to Ace's emphatic keyboards makes it clear that in addition to being a consummate composer and vocalist, he was likewise one helluva boogie-style pianist. Three of the four cuts from their next date are also included, specifically worthy of note are the loose and limber instrumentals "Aces Wild" and "Burley Cutie," while the languid ballad "Angel" is akin to Ace and company's standard fare. Beginning in January '53, Ace began working with the Johnny Otis Band. The results speak for themselves, especially "The Clock"'s foreboding temperament and Ace's decidedly impetuous side, displayed as he is flanked by Big Mama Thornton (vocals) for "Yes Baby." "Please Forgive Me" and Ace's biggest crossover entry "Pledging My Love" followed in rather quick succession and not surprisingly both became huge R&B hits as well. Johnny Board (sax), the leader of Ace's touring ensemble, became the musical director for his final batch of tunes. The urban jazz vibe of "Never Let Me Go" and the mid-tempo blues "No Money" are taken from those sessions. Although Memorial Album is out of print, interested parties are encouraged to treat themselves to the Complete Duke Recordings (2005) from the internet audio boutique Hip-O Select -- online at www.hip-oselect.com -- as it houses all 20 of Johnny Ace's seminal contributions to pop music.

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mp3 192 kbps - 70 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b318fff/n/jama_rar

Little Milton - The Sun Masters - 1990.


Review:

While he was at Sun, Little Milton tried a variety of different sounds and styles -- sounding like everybody from Elmore James and B.B. King to Fats Domino -- which was all tied together by his raw, manic lead guitar. The Sun Masters collects many of Milton's absolute finest moments -- he never again sounded quite as wild or reckless, either vocally or instrumentally, as he did here.

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mp3 160 kbps - 40 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b31c677/n/lmsm1990_rar

Big Jack Johnson - We Got Stop This Killing - 1998.


Dirty:

This Excellent Electric Delta stuff!!!


Tracks:

1-We Got Stop This Killing
2-Hummin' Blues
3-Breakdown Blues
4-It's The Fourth Of July
5-Lonesome Road
6-No Good Cow
7-Cracklin' Bread
8-Sweet Home Mississippi
9-Black Rooster
10-Big Foot Woman

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mississippimoan
mp3 256 kbps - 92 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b31cf6f/n/bjjwgstk_rar

Ted Hawkins - The Ted Hawkins Story... Suffer No More - 1998.


Review:

Taken individually, Hawkins' albums didn't measure up to his critical reputation, due to uneven material, occasionally inappropriate production, and overreliance upon covers. More than most best-ofs, this 20-song compilation is a revelation of sorts. By focusing on his best moments, it's much easier to make a convincing case for Hawkins as a major, if erratic, roots-music performer who sounded like a coarsened, acoustic-oriented Sam Cooke. The set goes all the way back to both sides of his rare (and good) 1966 soul single on the Money label and highlights the best originals from the '70s and '80s sessions released on Rounder, wisely selecting sparsely from his cover-dominated albums of the mid-'80s. The songs from his major-label finale The Next Hundred Years can veer toward production slickness, but there's a pleasing bonus in three acoustic, previously unreleased cuts from the early 1990s. It's an intelligently selected, well-rounded disc, presenting several sides of this idiosyncratic artist: composer, folky interpreter of material by Sam Cooke and Brook Benton, and country tinged soul artist.

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mp3 320 kbps - 143 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b31d14g/n/thtths_rar

Thursday, March 31, 2011

Big Jack Johnson - Katrina - 2009.


Biography:

Contemporary Mississippi blues doesn't get any nastier than in Big Jack Johnson's capable hands. The ex-oil truck driver's axe cuts like a rusty machete, his rough-hewn vocals a siren call to Delta passion. But he's a surprisingly versatile songwriter; Daddy, When Is Mama Comin Home?, his ambitious 1990 set for Earwig, found him tackling issues as varied as AIDS, wife abuse, and Chinese blues musicians in front of slick, horn-leavened arrangements!

Big Jack Johnson was a chip off the old block musically. His dad was a local musician playing both blues and country ditties at local functions; by the time he was 13 years old, Johnson was sitting in on guitar with his dad's band. At age 18, Johnson was following B.B. King's electrified lead. His big break came when he sat in with bluesmen Frank Frost and Sam Carr at the Savoy Theatre in Clarksdale. The symmetry between the trio was such that they were seldom apart for the next 15 years, recording for Phillips International and Jewel with Frost, the bandleader.

Chicago blues aficionado Michael Frank was so mesmerized by the trio's intensity when he heard them playing in 1975 at Johnson's Mississippi bar, the Black Fox, that Frank Frost eventually formed Earwig just to capture their steamy repertoire. That album, Rockin' the Juke Joint Down, came out in 1979 (as by the Jelly Roll Kings) and marked Johnson's first recordings as a singer.

Johnson's subsequent 1987 album for Earwig, The Oil Man, still ranks as his most intense and moving, sporting a hair-raising rendition of "Catfish Blues." The '90s have been good to Big Jack Johnson. In addition to Daddy, When is Mama Comin Home?, he released a live record and two studio albums -- 1996's We Got to Stop This Killing and 1998's All the Way Back. He also appeared in the acclaimed film documentary Deep Blues and on its resulting soundtrack, returning in 2000 with Roots Stew.

Password and Link:
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mp3 320 kbps - 168 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b31d31f/n/bjjk_rar