Thursday, March 31, 2011

Big Jack Johnson - Katrina - 2009.


Biography:

Contemporary Mississippi blues doesn't get any nastier than in Big Jack Johnson's capable hands. The ex-oil truck driver's axe cuts like a rusty machete, his rough-hewn vocals a siren call to Delta passion. But he's a surprisingly versatile songwriter; Daddy, When Is Mama Comin Home?, his ambitious 1990 set for Earwig, found him tackling issues as varied as AIDS, wife abuse, and Chinese blues musicians in front of slick, horn-leavened arrangements!

Big Jack Johnson was a chip off the old block musically. His dad was a local musician playing both blues and country ditties at local functions; by the time he was 13 years old, Johnson was sitting in on guitar with his dad's band. At age 18, Johnson was following B.B. King's electrified lead. His big break came when he sat in with bluesmen Frank Frost and Sam Carr at the Savoy Theatre in Clarksdale. The symmetry between the trio was such that they were seldom apart for the next 15 years, recording for Phillips International and Jewel with Frost, the bandleader.

Chicago blues aficionado Michael Frank was so mesmerized by the trio's intensity when he heard them playing in 1975 at Johnson's Mississippi bar, the Black Fox, that Frank Frost eventually formed Earwig just to capture their steamy repertoire. That album, Rockin' the Juke Joint Down, came out in 1979 (as by the Jelly Roll Kings) and marked Johnson's first recordings as a singer.

Johnson's subsequent 1987 album for Earwig, The Oil Man, still ranks as his most intense and moving, sporting a hair-raising rendition of "Catfish Blues." The '90s have been good to Big Jack Johnson. In addition to Daddy, When is Mama Comin Home?, he released a live record and two studio albums -- 1996's We Got to Stop This Killing and 1998's All the Way Back. He also appeared in the acclaimed film documentary Deep Blues and on its resulting soundtrack, returning in 2000 with Roots Stew.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 168 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b31d31f/n/bjjk_rar

Katie Webster - Deluxe Edition - 1991.



Review:

Katie Webster plays barrelhouse boogie-woogie, New Orleans R&B, Gulf Coast swamp pop, deep bayou blues and Southern gospel-flavored soul like nobody's business; her 35 years of professional piano work has appeared on at least 500 singles, including the original version of "Sea of Love," and countless albums. Music critics and fans around the world acknowledge her as the premier female blues piano player anywhere. Alligator Records' Deluxe Edition collects 15 of her very best tracks from her three albums since 1988, and there isn't a filler track to be found. Webster never once failed to deliver on her sassy and sensuous blend of barrelhouse boogie-woogie. Some of the high points of Deluxe Edition include several duets -- "Love Deluxe" with Vasti Jackson and the classic "Who's Making Love," which finds Kim Wilson (the Fabulous Thunderbirds) and bluesman Robert Cray jamming with the Boogie Queen. Wilson also accompanies Bonnie Raitt and Webster to wail "On the Run." Other standout tracks include her remake of "Sea of Love" and the non-vegetarian "A Little Meat on the Side." "The Love You Save" and "Two Fisted Mama" are sure to go down in the music history books as prime examples of Webster's swamp boogie styles. But perhaps the best cuts of the 15 are the blues-rich vocals and sax of "Try a Little Tenderness," a sure winner, and "Never Let Me Go," a torch-bearing ballad. Alligator's Deluxe Editions are just that -- the best songs by the best artists in their catalog. And Katie Webster ranks right there at the top of that rich list.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 128 kbps - 50 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b31d79g/n/kwde_rar

Joe Hill Louis - Boogie In The Park - Recorded Between 1950 and 1953, Released in 2000.


Review:

Everything that Joe Hill Louis recorded for Modern and Meteor in the early '50s is on this 28-track compilation. That includes singles, scattered cuts that would first show up on numerous anthologies on different labels years after they were recorded, and a previously unissued alternate take of "At the Woodchopper's Ball (Jack Pot)." Virtually all of Louis' Sam Phillips-produced sides are here, and there's even an extensive interview with Phillips in the liner notes. Most of the Phillips material is one-man blues, stuff that in its way reflects the transition from country blues to electric blues and rock & roll. Perhaps it's heretical to say so, but some of this might have been better served by a full band. Louis was a sturdy, engagingly good-natured singer and decent electric guitarist and harmonica player, capable of dishing out some good instrumental boogies once in a while as well. But the rhythm, supplied by hi-hat and bass drum, is perfunctory in both its texture and power. In fact, one of the Phillips-overseen songs (Sonny Boy Williamson's "Eyesight to the Blind") does add piano and drums, and some of the 1953 Meteor tracks got bass and drum overdubs. At any rate, it's decent early electric Memphis blues and the one-man multi-instrumentalist approach does set it off from the pack a bit, although the songs are more limited in musical range and adventurousness than those of the best Memphis bluesmen who followed in the next few years.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 168 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b31d71g/n/jhlbitp.rar

Tab Benoit - Live Swampland Jam - 1997.



Review:

This is by far the best album this Louisiana blues/swamp-rocker has come up with to date. Benoit is playing with basically a three-piece, with Doug Therrien on bass and Allyn Robinson on drums. The rest of the sound is filled in by various guests, some exceedingly strong Louisiana players. Therein lives both the problem and the strength of this disc -- the sound is a bit thin when there's no guest taking up some space. Only on the slow burner "Heart of Stone" and "Gone Too Long" does the basic band fill up the airwaves. The music is good, but without that fourth player, it doesn't have enough density. When there is another player, the sound is as gritty and raw as they come -- Cajun-based blues with a swampy sensuality. Benoit's singing and guitar playing have taken giant steps forward and are up there with the best.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 192 kbps - 80 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b31f66b/n/tblslj_rar

Little Buster and Soul Brothers - Right On - 1995.


Review:

Literally from out of nowhere did this remarkable debut album arise by blind guitarist Little Buster and his combo (he's no stranger to the studio, though, with a handful of late-'60s 45s to his credit). Mixing blues and soul traditions with melismatic passion, Buster was responsible for one of 1995's best albums -- debut or otherwise.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 256 kbps - 87 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b3bhh0g/n/lbatsbro_rar

Silas Hogan - The Best of the Excello Masters - 1995.


Review:

This 26-track single-disc retrospective may not have every last alternate take extant on it, but you'll never need a better compilation mirroring Hogan's stay at the label. "Trouble At Home Blues," "I'm Gonna Quit You Pretty Baby" and "Here They Are Again" are just about as low down as Louisiana swamp blues gets and Jay Miller's studio sorcery is clearly on hand.

Password and Link:
rukusjuice
mp3 256 kbps - 120 Mb

Roy Book Binder - The Hillbilly Blues Cats - 1992.


Review:

A solid, if a bit uninspired, effort, The Hillbilly Blues Cats teams Book Binder with harp player Rock Bottom and bassist Billy Ochoa. Together the trio make their way through oft-forgotten blues chestnuts such as "One Meatball" and "Tired of Bein' Mistreated," as well as the occasional Binder composition thrown in for good measure. A talented guitarist who studied under Rev. Gary Davis and Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup, Binder's music on this album suffers the fate of many modern day blues traditionalists -- that is, allowing the audience to ask the question "Why not just listen to the original?" Recording a song like "Statesboro Blues," which everyone from the Allman Brothers to Taj Mahal have done better, only furthers the point. Though he is a fine reproducer of old-time country blues, on Hillbilly Blues Cats Binder has yet to find the key to making his music sound like more than just a reproduction.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 128 kbps - 41 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b555a03/n/rbb.rar

Johnny Jones - Live In Chicago with Billy Boy Arnold - Recorded in 1963, Released in 1979.


Review:

Thank heaven Norman Dayron had the presence of mind to capture these sides by Chicago pianist Johnny Jones when he played at the Fickle Pickle in 1963 -- as little as remains on tape of his talents as a singer, we're eternally indebted to Dayron's actions. Jones's insinuating vocals and bedrock 88s are abetted by harpist Billy Boy Arnold on these performances, and that's it -- he had no rhythm section to fall back on.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 256 kbps - 73 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b325gee/n/ljjlicwbba_rar

Bobby "Blue" Bland - Two Steps from The Blues - 1961.



Review:

Without a doubt, Two Steps from the Blues is the definitive Bobby "Blue" Bland album and one of the great records in electric blues and soul-blues. In fact, it's one of the key albums in modern blues, marking a turning point when juke joint blues were seamlessly blended with gospel and Southern soul, creating a distinctly Southern sound where all of these styles blended so thoroughly it was impossible to tell where one began and one ended. Given his Memphis background, Bobby "Blue" Bland was perfectly suited for this kind of amalgam as envisioned by producer/arranger Joe Scott, who crafted these wailing horn arrangements that sounded as impassioned as Bland's full-throated, anguished vocals. It helped, of course, that the songs were uniformly brilliant. Primarily from the pen of Deadric Malone, along with Duke head Don Robey and Scott (among others), these are the tunes that form the core of Bobby "Blue" Bland's legend and the foundation of soul-blues: "Two Steps from the Blues," "I Don't Want No Woman," "Cry, Cry, Cry," "I'm Not Ashamed," "Lead Me On," "Little Boy Blue" -- songs so good they overshadow standards like "St. James Infirmary." These are songs that blur the division between Ray Charles soul and Chess blues, opening the doors for numerous soul and blues sounds, from Muscle Shoals and Stax through the modern-day soul-bluesman. Since this, like many blues albums from the late '50s/early '60s, was a collection of singles, it's possible to find the key tracks, even the entire album, on the numerous Bobby "Blue" Bland collections released over the years, but this remains an excellent, essential blues album on its own terms -- one of the greatest ever released.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 192 kbps - 40 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b325h8c/n/bbb2sftb.rar

Big Maybelle - The Complete Okeh Sessions 1952 , 1955 - 1994.


Review:

This collection features Big Maybelle's entire OKeh output -- 26 tracks -- including her three R&B chart items, "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On," and the risqué slow blues "I'm Gettin' 'Long Alright." "Gabbin' Blues," her 1952 OKeh debut smash, is a humorous dialogue between Maybelle and gossiping rival Rose Marie McCoy, the tune's co-writer. Maybelle was no mere copyist; her sandpapery vocals stood in sharp contrast to the many interchangeable thrushes then populating the R&B world. New York session wizards such as tenor saxophonist Sam "The Man" Taylor and guitarist Mickey Baker provide great support throughout.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 256 kbps - 131 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b3262cg/n/bmtcos_rar

James Son Thomas - Beefsteak Blues - Recorded in 1985, Released in 1998.


Review:

Down-and-dirty blues don't get any downer or dirtier than James "Son" Thomas. A former sharecropper and grave digger (as well as an accomplished sculptor) who was shot by an ex-wife, Thomas, to put it mildly, lived the blues life he sang about. Eventually his hard road took him all the way to the White House, where he sang the blues for the Reagans (those noted blues lovers) in 1982. This Evidence collection of early-'80s performances features Thomas accompanying himself on acoustic and electric guitar on a set of blues standards associated with his Mississippi Delta mentors Elmore James, Arthur Crudup, and Sonny Boy Williamson. Compare the two versions of "Catfish Blues" for an example of what "unexpurgated" really means.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 256 - 85 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b32644d/n/jstbb.rar

Johnny Shines - Last Night's Dream - 1968.


Review:

It's no wonder that this album, cut in 1968 with British blues maven Mike Vernon at the helm, works so well. When you team a rejuvenated Shines with his longtime compadres Horton, Spann, bassist Willie Dixon, and drummer Clifton James, a little blues history was bound to be made.

Password and link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 80 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b326532/n/jslnd.rar

Lonnie Pitchford - All Around Man - 1994.



Review:

Mississippi bluesman Lonnie Pitchford makes good on his claim with All Around Man. Voted as one of the 40 best under-40 blues musicians by Living Blues magazine a few years back, Pitchford is an accomplished pianist and rhythm, slide and lead guitarist, as well as a master of the diddley bow, a one-stringed instrument he has played since the age of five. Rearranging popular standards such as "See See Rider" and "If I Had Possession Over Judgement Day," Pitchford blends his own style with that of his idols, namely Robert Johnson and Elmore James. Containing a little bit of everything, the record see-saws between Pitchford fronting an electric band, playing unaccompanied guitar, and playing a moving rendition of "My Sunny" on acoustic piano. All Around Man is just that, a fine introduction to the various sides of Pitchford's muse.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 256 kbps - 110 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b3267b2/n/lpaam_rar

John Lee Hooker - The Healer - 1989.




Review:

The Healer was oddly a major mainstream breakthrough for John Lee Hooker. The album was one of the first to feature a wide array of guest stars, including Bonnie Raitt, Los Lobos and Carlos Santana. The album immediately captured widespread media attention because of all the superstar musicians involved in its production and has to date been John Lee's most successful release. Recorded in analog and mixed to 1/4" 15ips analog tape, the sound is better than almost any other Hooker recording. Transferred from the original 1/4" analog tapes by Bernie Grundman using Classic's "all tube" cutting system, gives this release a warmth and comfort it has never had. If you're a John Lee Hooker fan then this a must! Great sound and classic Hooker guitar and vocal performances.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 92Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b3269f6/n/jlhth.rar

James Son Thomas - Son Down the Delta - 1982.


Review:

Son Thomas: Son Down on the Delta is a very good live album recorded in Fort Worth, Texas in 1981. Thomas largely sticks to standards here, but the reason to listen to him is the subtle textures of his guitar and voice, which make these well-known songs come alive.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 192 kbps - 50 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b3269hc/n/jstdotd_rar

Roy Book Binder - Polk City Ramble - 1998.


Review:

On Polk City Ramble, Roy Book Binder toughens his acoustic blues sound with the addition of bass and drums; while primarily comprised of originals, the LP also sports intriguing covers from artists ranging from Blind Lemon Jefferson to Billy Joe Shaver.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 128 kbps - 43 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b327824/n/rbbpcr_rar

Roy Book Binder - Singer, Songwriter Blues man - 2001.


Review:

Bluesman Roy Book Binder's droll vocals and ragtime-based fingerpicking are front and center on this acoustic solo package. The 14 original songs -- at least some of which Book Binder featured in other versions on earlier albums -- include plenty of examples of his dry wit (see particularly "New Age Woman Blues" and "Can't Do That No More"). There are also affecting tributes to Book Binder's influences, such as Pink Anderson ("Travelin' Man Blues"), Reverend Gary Davis ("While He Served His Time" and "The Preacher Picked the Guitar"), and Blind Lemon Jefferson ("Blind Lemon"). Some might argue that Book Binder's vocal style fares best with richer accompaniment, in which case his many albums with instrumentalists like Fats Kaplin and Jerry Douglas might offer a better introduction. Be that as it may, this is first-rate country blues, and at least some of the songs have the feel of timeless classics.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 256 kbps - 90 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b3279b2/n/rbbssb_rar

Skip James - Hard Time Killing Floor - 2003.



Review:

Hard Time Killing Floor Blues was the first session Skip James recorded following his rediscovery by John Fahey and Henry Vestine in the mid-'60s. Though he had not played the blues for more than 20 years, his skills were largely undiminished, and he turns in a fantastic set here. James was the pinnacle of the Bentonia (Mississippi) sound, which combines complex fingerpicking with falsetto vocals, resulting in somewhat spooky-sounding strain of blues. James reprises several of his 1931 Paramount sides on this session, as well as a couple new tunes that chronicle the illnesses of James' latter days. Anyone with a passing interest in acoustic blues should own some James. This set would make a great starting point, especially for those who don't take well to the surface noise that can accompany his '30s sessions. The new mastering here sounds rich and warm. Highly recommended. [This set was previously released as Biograph 122, with a different running order.]

Password and link:
mississippimoan
mp3 160 kbps - 50 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b3279h4/n/sjhtkgb_rar

Guy Davis - Chocolate to the Bone - 2003.


Review:

With each new release, the clothes of an old bluesman fit Guy Davis more and more comfortably. By now the blues are completely a part of who he is, so when he reworks an old Sleepy John Estes song into the opener, "Limetown," it feels completely natural; even with the familiar "Rollin' And Tumblin'" riff. He mixes it up well between covers and originals, taking in quite a range -- there's John Lee Hooker, Willie Dixon, and Blind Lemon Jefferson all sitting amicably together in his style; as well as some pieces like "Step It Up And Go" that are just plain old. His own material is less familiar, of course, but just as good, with the careful (if not wholly accurate) patina of age about it. Perhaps the best thing about Davis is that he never tries to be something he's not; there's no fake Southern accent. What you hear is what you get. And while he's hardly the guitar genius that Charley Patton and Robert Johnson were, he's more than adequate, and his excellent band backs him up solidly and subtly, never stepping out too far. There's plenty of talent in Davis, but there's also an obvious and deep love for the blues, especially the rural country blues, and he brings to his music a real timelessness. The man just keeps getting better and better.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 111 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b327ae6/n/gdcttb_rar

Lightnin' Hopkins - Goin' Away - 1963.


Review:

For the 1963 album Goin' Away Lightnin' Hopkins was backed by a spare rhythm section -- bassist Leonard Gaskin and drummer Herb Lovelle -- who managed to follow his ramshackle, instinctual sense of rhythm quite dexterously, giving Hopkins' skeletal guitar playing some muscle. Still, the spotlight remains  Hopkins, who is in fine form here. There are no real classics here, but everything is solid, particularly "Stranger Here" and "You Better Stop Her," making it worth investigation by serious fans of Hopkins' classic material.

Password and Links:
mississippimoan
flac - 220 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b327eb4/n/lhga_part1_rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b327gg6/n/lhga_part2_rar

Peg Leg Sam - Kickin' It - Recorded in 1972, Released on 2000.


Review:

Peg Leg Sam was not your typical country-blues performer -- he was in a class all his own. Born in 1911, he naturally embraced the country-blues of his generation, while also maintaining the early medicine show roots he learned as a child. Sam's sometimes humorous and always impassioned monologues, combined with harp virtuosity (he sometimes played two of them at once), came from a life of dedicated showmanship built up after years of passing the hat for crowds of spectators. Since Sam was definitely under-recorded, he has gained status as one of those irreplaceable characters who fell through the cracks, making these sessions fortunate to have available. These tracks were originally released on the Trix label as Medicine Show Man, and are now available as Kickin' It on 32 Blues. Sam is accompanied separately on the disc by guitarists Baby Tate and Rufe Johnson, from two South Carolina sessions recorded in Spartanburg during 1970 and Jonesville two years later.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 145 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b32816d/n/plski_rar

J.B. Hutto and His Hawks - Masters of Modern Blues - Recorded in 1966, Released in 1995.


Review:

1966 was a banner year for Hutto and His Hawks -- in addition to laying down the lion's share of his killer Delmark album, the slide master also waxed a similarly incendiary set for Pete Welding's Testament logo. Vicious versions of "Pet Cream Man," "Lulubelle's Here," and "Bluebird" are but a few of its charms, with Big Walter Horton's unmistakable harp winding through the proceedings

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 70 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b328bbc/n/jbmomb.rar

Gene Taylor - Gene Taylor - 2003.



Dirty:


I really like this one a lot, the whole album is very enjoyable and the tones are amazing!


Tracks:
1-Pinetop's Boogie-Woogie
2-Sugar Bee
3-Mississippi Heavy Water Blues
4-Pete's Thing
5-Blues For Jerry West
6-Santa Fe
7-Honky Tonk Train Blues
8-Six Weeks Old Blues
9-This World
10-The Loser And The Wheel
11-Ya Ya
12-Is There Peace


Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3
320 kbps - 100 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b32b406/n/gtgt_rar

Ronnie Earl - I Like It When It Rains - 1990.


Review:

Not since Robert Lockwood jr. has a guitar player mastered the intense soulfulness of Ronnie Earl. Ronnie's earlier recordings on the Black Top label pale in comparision to this record. The single string guitar riffs are smooth, and crisp in the vain of T-Bone Walker, while the Broadcasters make you feel as if your standing in a Chicago juke joint. The song selection is a perfect mix of instumental, and throaty tin pan alley numbers. A must have!

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 92 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b3dgggg/n/reiliwir.rar

Slim Harpo - Rainin' In My Heart - 1961.



Review:

This man influenced The Rolling Stones, The Beatles, The Blues Brothers and The Kinks....If you want a dose of the real stuff (BLUES)...."Raining In My Heart" is it. Although Slim Harpo wasn't widely acclaimed as a singer, songwriter or musician by the public, other musicians were certainly aware of him. For a number of reasons, it's virtually impossible to properly document all of Slim "James Moore" Harpo's hits, this is truly one of the best ever released. Eventhough he died in 1970, this Blues Masters music will always be around. When you buy this package you're in store for some great stuff!!!

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 192 - 45 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b32f29c/n/shrimh_rar

Slim Harpo - The Scratch - Recorded in 1961, Released in 1996.



Review:

A 25-track single-disc compilation loaded with previously unissued sides and alternate takes (the title track is an interesting variant of his hit, "Baby, Scratch My Back"), making it the perfect companion volume to Hip Shakin'. This also has the added bonus of more (and even wilder) live recordings from the infamous 1961 frat party dance in Alabama. Dodgy sound on the live sides, but performances too great to leave in the can either way.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 224 kbps - 72 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b32f3g2/n/shtsrandu_rar

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Billy Boy Arnold - Going To Chicago - 1966.


Review:

Uneven but intriguing 1966 collection, most of it previously unreleased. The first half-dozen sides are the best, full of ringing West Side-styled guitar licks by Mighty Joe Young and Jody Williams and Arnold's insinuating vocals (he rocks "Baby Jane" with a Chuck Berry-inspired fury). An odd drumless trio backs Arnold on the next seven selections, which get a little sloppy at times but retain period interest nonetheless.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 192 kbps - 52 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b32fd83/n/bbagtc_rar

Billy Boy arnold - Back Where I Belong - 1993.


Review:

Indeed he is. Recorded in Los Angeles with a crew of young acolytes offering spot-on backing (guitarists Zach Zunis and Rick Holmstrom acquit themselves well), Arnold eases back into harness with a remake of "I Wish You Would" before exposing some fine new originals (the Chuck Berry-styled rocker "Move on Down the Road" is a stomping standout) and an homage to his old mentor Sonny Boy (a romping "Shake the Boogie").

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 192 kbps - 74 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b32fdg9/n/bbabwib_rar

Furry Lewis - Furry Lewis In His Prime 1927- 1928 - 1988.


Review:

In His Prime (1927-1928) is the best overview of Furry Lewis classic late-'20s sides, containing 14 songs from the period (though not "John Henry"), all of which are crisply remastered, showing off both his superb guitar playing and his brilliantly expressive singing (the vocal performance on "Falling Down Blues" alone is worth the price of the disc) to excellent advantage. A seminal part of any blues collection, as well as any collection of Lewis' material.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 224 kbps - 50 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b332ebc/n/flihp.rar

B.B. King - Boss Of The Blues - 1965.


Tracks:

1. Bad Breaks
2. You Don't Know
3. Worry, Worry
4. The Blues Has Got Me
5. Please Accept My Love
6. I Had a Woman
7. You Know I Go for You
8. That's How Much You Mean to Me
9. Days of Old
10. Why Does Everything Happen to Me

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 256 kbps - 50 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b33305e/n/bbkbotb_rar

Champion Jack Dupree - Back Home In New Orleans - 1990.




Review:

By far the best of Dupree's three albums for Bullseye Blues, this collection was cut during the pianist's first trip home to the Crescent City in 36 long years. With his longtime accompanist Kenn Lending on guitar, Dupree sounds happy to be back in his old stomping grounds throughout the atmospheric set.


Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 256 kbps - 79 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b333g79/n/cjdbhino.rar

Bo Diddley - The Chess Years (12 cd Box Set) - 1993.


Review:

Charly Records' The Chess Years has assembled most -- though not quite all -- of the music that the Originator recorded for Chess Records, which, unfortunately, means a lot of his lesser work as well -- 282 recordings, made between 1955 and 1974, on 12 CDs; looking at it is like staring across the Grand Canyon, except you want to jump into this if you have any sense. If the collection seems like overkill, that's because it is, and there's some poor material here from the late '60s and early '70s, when Bo was searching for a new commercial sound, although some of the latter isn't really bad -- his covers of Al Kooper's "I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know" or the Band's "The Shape I'm In" from Another Dimension are soulful and moving, but just aren't what one buys a Bo Diddley album to hear (along with the girlie chorus on "Bad Moon Rising"). There are more than enough jewels -- and jewels that are likely never to appear otherwise on compact disc -- to attract serious rock & roll listeners, if you can swing the price, which is around $120. The highlights (which would be far more costly to find on vinyl today) include "Bo Meets the Monster," his catchy (and very funny) answer to "Purple People Eater"; "Here 'Tis," which became famous when covered by the Yardbirds, but only really comes to life in the hands of the originator; the comical "Bucket," "Lazy Woman," and "Run Diddley Daddy"; the rousing, slashing "Puttentang"; the side-splittingly funny biographical song "All Together," a sort of sequel to "The Story of Bo Diddley"; the complete Bo Diddley's Beach Party album, and a handful of demos from the late 1960 sessions that yielded tracks for the Bo Diddley Is a Twister album. Additionally, the collection gives the listener a chance to see how Bo explored different variations on his sound, adapting it to doo wop, folk, and even calypso, all of which worked better than one would have expected, plus soul and funk, which didn't. The sessionography is very detailed and pretty cool, and the notes are among the better biographical accounts of Bo's life and career -- oh, and there are lots of pictures of Bo and the Duchess re-created throughout the set. There are problems with the mastering, however -- momentary gaps exist in one or two songs, and the sound quality in certain places, such as the live Beach Party material, leaves something to be desired. But at its best, and that is often (at least through the mid-'60s), this set presents one of the primal forces in rock & roll.

Password and Links:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 2,0 Gb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b339aaa/n/bdtcy.part01.rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b339ad5/n/bdtcy.part02.rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b339abc/n/bdtcy.part03.rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b33a9bh/n/bdtcy.part04.rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b33a854/n/bdtcy.part05.rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b33a83g/n/bdtcy.part06.rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b33a32d/n/bdtcy.part07.rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b339h9g/n/bdtcy.part08.rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b339h96/n/bdtcy.part09.rar
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b339cgh/n/bdtcy.part10.rar

Bo Diddley - A Man Amongst Men - 1996.


Review:

Bo Diddley's major-label '90s comeback effort A Man Amongst Men is overflowing with guest stars, but it rarely gels into something distinctive. The presence of such heavyweights as Keith Richards, Ron Wood, and Jimmie Vaughan actually weighs down the set, preventing Diddley from digging deep into the grooves. The band never quite rocks hard enough and no one tears off an inspired solo -- A Man Amongst Men is pleasant, but it never approaches compelling listening.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
flac - 375 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b33f3de/n/bd.rar

John Lee Hooker - Jack O'Diamonds - Recorded in 1949, Released in 2004.


Review:

The material on Jack o' Diamonds was recorded in 1949 but never released at the time due to John Lee Hooker's vast contractual problems. Even at this earliest point in his career, Hooker was tied up in contracts that would see him recording under several aliases in order to make some quick cash. These 20 cuts were recorded at a private gathering in the Detroit dining room of Gene Deitchat, who set up a primitive recording device and let Hooker play. During the course of the evening those present began requesting that he play a few spirituals and folk tunes. It's interesting to hear Hooker bite into such traditional fare as "Two White Horses," "Trouble in Mind," "John Henry," and "Jack o' Diamonds." Since these recordings have been cleaned and remastered, this disc is well worth picking up for Hooker fanatics.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 VBR - 59 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b340905/n/jlhjod.rar

Magic Sam - The Essential Magic Sam: The Cobra and Chief Recordings, 1957- 1961.



Review:

Fuel 2000's Essential Magic Sam: The Cobra and Chief Recordings 1957-1961 is the latest, best-sounding repackaging of this material. If you already have this material elsewhere in your collection (and given the number of times it's come out in various incarnations, you very well may), you don't need to replace your previous disc, but if you're looking for the best-available collection of this seminal material, turn here.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 150 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b340ba5/n/mste.rar

The Staple Singers - The Best of Vee Jay Years - 2007.


Review:

Since the Staple Singers are best known for their hits as a secular soul act on Stax in the late '60s and the 1970s, general fans should be advised that The Best of the Vee-Jay Years includes only gospel material, released for Vee-Jay (in 1956-1961) long before they moved to Stax. If you're aware of this and are simply looking for a good single-disc overview of their early years on disc, however, this fills that bill well. Their two most well-known songs from this period, "Uncloudy Day" and "This May Be the Last Time" (speculated as a possible source for the Rolling Stones' "The Last Time"), open and close the 17-track CD, respectively. Between those cuts are both Pops Staples originals and covers of traditional tunes like "Swing Down Chariot" and "Will the Circle Be Unbroken." It's been said before, but it can be said here again: these are among the most accessible gospel recordings for rock-oriented listeners, owing to Pops Staples' distinctive tremolo-heavy electric guitar, the frequent use of light rhythmic drums, and the obvious connections to the soul music the Staples would make in their later incarnation. It's not necessarily going to be to the taste of every Staple Singers  fan who loves them for their soul recordings, but it's first-rate, well-harmonized gospel with obvious links to the R&B and soul idioms.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 - 101 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b340e55/n/tstbovjy.rar

B.B. King - The Best of the Early Years - 2007.


Review:

There have been numerous compilations of the best of B.B. King's recordings for the Modern label in the 1950s and early '60s, and if you've already picked up one of them, there isn't an urgent reason to replace or upgrade it with this CD. If not, however, this certainly makes a good bid to be considered as the best single-disc anthology of this era. The 25 tracks include many of his biggest hits and most famous classics from the period, among them "3 O'Clock Blues," "Woke Up This Morning," "Every Day I Have the Blues," "Sweet Little Angel," "Sweet Sixteen," "How Blue Can You Get?," and "Rock Me Baby," and the lesser-known tunes are of equal or near-equal quality. It's true that if you have a bit more cash and time, you might be better off with the two-CD, 40-track Original Greatest Hits, which might be a little easier to find in the U.S. than this U.K. import as well. It's also true that if you want a whole lotta Modern sides by King, you could plumb for Ace's four-CD The Vintage Years box, as well as the same label's extensive series of individual B.B. King CDs of Modern material. If you're not a completist, however, it'll come as something of a revelation as to how much better early King sounds when that mammoth body of work is whittled down to his best and, for the most part, most accessible stuff. To those more used to his later recordings, too, it will come as a surprise to hear how raw and raucous some of these performances sound in comparison to his more urbane soul-blues of later years; a few of them are even a bit influenced by early rock & roll. Note that the one previously unreleased track, by the way, is a "previously unissued intercut version of takes 2, 3, 4" of "Why I Sing the Blues" that even many completists could probably live without.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 192 kbps - 100 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b3469g2/n/bbktbotey.rar

Jo Ann Kelly - Jo Ann Kelly - 1969.

Jo Ann's Bio:

The rock era saw a few white female singers, like Janis Joplin, show they could sing the blues. But one who could outshine them all -- Jo Ann Kelly -- seemed to slip through the cracks, mostly because she favored the acoustic, Delta style rather than rocking out with a heavy band behind her. But with a huge voice, and a strong guitar style influenced by Memphis Minnie and Charley Patton, she was the queen. Born January 5, 1944, Kelly and her older brother Dave were both taken by the blues, and born at the right time to take advantage of a young British blues scene in the early '60s. By 1964 she was playing in clubs, including the Star in Croydon, and had made her first limited-edition record with future Groundhogs guitarist Tony McPhee. She expanded to play folk and blues clubs all over Britain, generally solo, but occasionally with other artists, bringing together artists like Bessie Smith and Sister Rosetta Tharpe into her own music. After the first National Blues Federation Convention in 1968 her career seemed ready to take flight. She began playing the more lucrative college circuit, followed by her well-received debut album in 1969. At the second National Blues Convention, she jammed with Canned Heat, who invited her to join them on a permanent basis. She declined, not wanting to be a part of a band -- and made the same decision when Johnny Winter offered to help her. Throughout the '70s, Kelly continued to work and record solo, while also gigging for fun in bands run by friends, outfits like Tramp and Chilli Willi -- essentially pub rock, as the scene was called, and in 1979 she helped found the Blues Band, along with brother Dave, and original Fleetwood Mac bassist Bob Brunning. The band backed her on an ambitious show she staged during the early '80s, Ladies and the Blues, in which she paid tribute to her female heros. In 1988, Kelly began to suffer pain. A brain tumor was diagnosed and removed, and she seemed to have recovered, even touring again in 1990 with her brother before collapsing and dying on October 21. Posthumously, she's become a revered blues figure, one who helped clear the path for artists like Bonnie Raitt and Rory Block. But more than a figurehead, her recorded material -- and unreleased sides have appeared often since her death -- show that Kelly truly was a remarkable blueswoman.


Tracks

1-Louisiana Blues
2-Fingerprints Blues
3-Driftin' and Driftin'
4-Look Here Partner
5-Moon Going Down
6-Yellow Bee Blues
7-Whiskey Head Woman
8-Sit Down On My Knee
9-Man I'm Lovin'
10-Jinx Blues
11-Come On In My Kitchen

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 55 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b34c8cc/n/jak1969.rar

Ted Hawkins - Happy Hour - 1986.

Review:

Guitarist/vocalist Ted Hawkins' second Rounder record enhanced his reputation. Happy Hour features Hawkins' memorable compositions, plus a wonderful version of Curtis Mayfield's "Gypsy Woman." Hawkins' vocals were even more gritty and striking, as was his acoustic guitar backing and chording. He teamed with his wife Elizabeth on "Don't Make Me Explain It," "My Last Goodbye," and "California Song," and with guitarist Night Train Clemons on "Gypsy Woman" and "You Pushed My Head Away." Hawkins blended soul and urban blues stylings with country and rural blues inflections and rhythms, making another first-rate release. 


Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 50 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b34e78f/n/thhh.rar

Byther Smith - Mississippi Kid - 1996.



Review:

The 1996 release Mississippi Kid sounds like it could have been released a quarter-century or more before, which is a compliment. Bracingly free of the rockist clichés that bog down so many latter-day blues albums, Mississippi Kid is solid Chicago-style blues, with Smith's guitar and vocals supported by two organists and a full horn section. Presented as a sort of musical autobiography, with the personal title track ending the album as a kind of summation, the album dusts off a couple of Smith's earlier hits, most notably a slow, gripping version of his signature song, "Give Me My White Robe," and the playful shaggy-dog story "Blues on the Moon," given a suitably light-hearted and sly treatment. Smith is in excellent voice throughout and his playing is as fine as always, making Mississippi Kid a late highlight in his long and sometimes underappreciated career. 

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 142 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b352f66/n/bs.rar

Pink Anderson - Carolina Blues Man, Vol. 1 - 1961.


Review:

A vast majority of the known professional recordings of Piedmont blues legend Pink Anderson were documented during 1961, the notable exception being the platter he split with Rev. Gary Davis -- Gospel, Blues and Street Songs -- which was documented in the spring of 1950. This is the first of three volumes that were cut for the Prestige Records subsidiary Bluesville. Carolina Blues Man finds Anderson performing solo -- with his own acoustic guitar accompaniment -- during a session cut on his home turf of Spartanburg, SC. Much -- if not all -- of the material Anderson plays has been filtered through and tempered by the unspoken blues edict of taking a familiar (read: traditional) standard and individualizing it enough to make it uniquely one's own creation. Anderson's approach is wholly inventive, as is the attention to detail in his vocal inflections, lyrical alterations, and, perhaps more importantly, Anderson's highly sophisticated implementation of tricky fretwork. His trademark style incorporates a combination of picking and strumming chords interchangeably. This nets Anderson an advanced, seemingly electronically enhanced sound. "Baby I'm Going Away" -- with its walkin' blues rhythms -- contains several notable examples of this technique, as does the introduction to "Every Day of the Week." The track also includes some of the most novel chord changes and progressions to be incorporated into the generally simple style of the street singer/minstrel tradition from which Pink Anderson participated in during the first half of the 20th Century. Listeners can practically hear Anderson crack a smile as he weaves an arid humor with overtly sexual connotations into his storytelling -- especially evident on "Try Some of That" and "Mama Where Did You Stay Last Night." Aficionados and most all students of the blues will inevitably consider this release an invaluable primer into the oft-overlooked southern East Coast Piedmont blues. 

Password and Link:
rukusjuice
mp3 128 - 35 Mb

Eric Bibb - Livin', Lovin' and Doin' - 2005.


Bibb's Bio:

Like Josh White, Jr., who is the son of folk singer Josh White, singer, songwriter, and guitarist Eric Bibb was raised in the folk tradition, the son of the folk singer Leon Bibb. Bibb's uncle was the world-famous jazz pianist and composer, John Lewis, part of the Modern Jazz Quartet. Bibb was raised in a music-filled household, as family friends in the 1950s and '60s included Pete Seeger, » Read more

Password and Link:
rukusjuice
mp3

Elmore James - The Final Sessions - 2006.



 
Review

One of the most important and influential figures on the post war blues scene, singer, guitarist and songwriter Elmore James was the unchallenged king of the electric slide guitar, updating the legacy of the country blues to post-war Chicago. His music, and particularly his guitar playing, has been a major source of inspiration for countless blues and rock musicians over the years. Eric Clapton, Duane Allman and Jimi Hendrix are just a few of the rock legends who have acknowledged his influence. This collection includes every complete master he recorded at his last 2 sessions for Bobby Robinson's Fire/Fury Label in New York City in February 1963, just 3 months before his untimely death from a heart attack at the age of 45. Packaged in a digipak.

Tracks

01 - My Baby's Gone.flac
02 - Find My Kinda Woman.flac
03 - Look On Yonder Wall (Look Up On The Wall).flac
04 - Dust My Broom.flac
05 - It Hurts Me Too.flac
06 - Pickin' The Blues (Manhattan Slide).flac
07 - Everyday I Have The Blues.flac
08 - I Have A Right To Love My Baby.flac
09 - Twelve Year Old Boy.flac
10 - Got To Move (She's Got To Go).flac
11 - I Gotta Go Now.flac
12 - Talk To Me Baby.flac
13 - Make My Dreams Come True.flac
14 - Hand In Hand.flac
15 - Can't Stop Loving My Baby.flac
16 - Dust My Broom.flac
17 - Elmore Jumps One (Up Jumps Elmore) , Black Snake Slid..
18 - I Believe.flac
19 - Hand In Hand.flac
20 - Find My Kind Of Woman (Take 1).flac
21 - Hand In Hand (Take 3).flac
22 - Back In Mississippi (Conversation).flac

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
FLAC
- 313 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b3530bd/n/ejtfs_rar

Arthur Big Boy Crudup - That's All Right Mama (Bluebird) - Recorded Between 1941 and 1954, Released in 1992.


Review:

If Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup had never made another fan in the course of his career than a certain young kid in Memphis, TN, his place in music history would still have been assured -- Elvis Presley often cited Crudup as one of his favorite blues artists, and the future "King of Rock & Roll" recorded three of Crudup's songs ("That's All Right, Mama," "My Baby Left Me," and "So Glad You're Mine"), bringing them to a far wider audience then their original author would ever enjoy on his own. Anyone expecting to hear Elvis' primal influence on That's All Right, Mama, a compilation of 22 songs Crudup recorded for the RCA-affiliated Bluebird label between 1941 and 1954, might be a bit disappointed -- for the most part, this is rough-and-ready rural blues, dominated by Crudup's big, boomy voice and simple but efficient guitar runs, though by the end of the disc, drums, electric guitars, and even saxophone have begun to creep into the mix, suggesting a stripped-down but high-powered Chicago blues combo. In short, this isn't rock & roll, or even rhythm & blues, but pure blues stuff, and it certainly makes clear that Presley's influences were a lot rawer and deeper than most folks would lead you to believe. That's All Right, Mama also reveals that Crudup deserves to be known as more than just the guy who Elvis liked -- this is a tough but good-grooving blues collection that should please those who like their blues straight with no chaser.

Password and Link:
rukusjuice
mp3 160 kbps - 68 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/ca64f40/n/abbctarm.rar

Gary B.B. Coleman - If You CAn't Beat Me Rockin' - 1988.

Review:

He was influenced by Jimmy Reed, T-Bone Walker, B.B. King, and Lightnin' Hopkins, along with country & western, cajun, and early rock & roll.

Tracks:

1. Watch Where You Stroke 
2. Cloud Nine 
3. Please Don't Dog Me 
4. If the Washing Don't Get You 
5. If You Can Beat Me Rockin' 
6. It Just Ain't Right 
7. Rub My Back 
8. St. James Infirmary 
9. Hide Away

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 128 kbps - 40 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b354423/n/gbbc.rar

Eddie Turner - Miracles and Demons - 2010.


Review:

Eddie Turner’s domain falls into a style that can easily cross over into contemporary blues. A fine singer with a flexible voice and depth of spirit, Turner presents his third album, a collection of originals that spans generations of genres, but still sounds updated and current. Texas-style swing or hard-churning rockers live alongside light funk acoustic numbers parallel to early John Lee Hooker, and the occasional downhearted blues. "Monkey See, Monkey Do" is the closest to an all-out rock song, while the most unusual track, "Say," is a stompdown in the odd meter of 10/8, very quirky but logical, with a deft slide guitar for flavoring. Turner's originality seems shaped by many influences (not the least of which his longtime association with Otis Taylor), but is quite different than the garden-variety sound processed by those like Robert Cray, as he forges his own individual path.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 119 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b354h5h/n/et.rar

J.W. Jones - Midnight Memphis Sun - 2010.


Review:

No longer a teenage prodigy, Canadian blues guitarist JW-Jones is pushing 30, and on his sixth album, Midnight Memphis Sun, he has decided to emphasize his fidelity to tradition, partially recording the disc in Sun Studio in Memphis, TN, and having veterans Charlie Musselwhite and Hubert Sumlin guest on three tracks each. Like many latter-day blues revivalists, Jones doesn't hew to any one style of the blues, preferring to move from one subgenre to another on each song. "Off the Market," the opening track, with its punchy horns, initially suggests that he might have wanted to record in the Stax Studio (if it still existed) instead of the Sun Studio; Lowell Fulson's "Love Grows Cold," which follows, is in a jump blues style; "Right on Time" has a ‘50s R&B sound; Jimmy Reed's "I Don't Go for That" recalls Howlin' Wolf-style Chicago blues; "Mean Streak" nods to Delta blues; and "Make a Move" is arranged like a B.B. King song. The majority of the compositions are Jones originals, although the tunes are so steeped in tradition that it's hard to think of them as new. With his co-writer, Tim Wynne-Jones, Jones seems to have been reading the newspapers since his last album, 2008's Bluelisted, as he tries to steer clear of the housing crisis in "Off the Market," singing, "Don't wanna go sub-prime," and devotes "Born Operator" to condemning Wall Street criminal Bernie Madoff and his "Ponzi schemes." As usual, Jones is more of a guitarist than a singer, not because his voice is bad, but because, with its clear tenor sound (which often recalls Edgar Winter), it sounds more like a pop voice than a blues voice. But then, this is a musician who thinks it's possible to turn fellow countryman Bryan Adams into a blues artist, treating the hit "Cuts Like a Knife" as if it were a blues song. Ten years into his recording career, Jones remains a talented mimic in search of his own style.

Password and link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 120 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b3547b0/n/jwjwmms.rar

J.W. Jones - Bluelisted - 2008.



Review:

Modern blues comes from throughout the world -- but Ottawa, Canada, is not a locale that immediately comes to mind when you think of the aforementioned musical genre. However, JW-Jones is proof once and for all that you can never pin down where bluesmen hail from, as evidenced by his fifth release overall, 2008's Bluelisted. Admittedly, the album is more similar stylistically to Stevie Ray Vaughan (minus the guitar hero solos) and the Fabulous Thunderbirds than to authentic blues artists. But still, with the majority of modern day pop and rock music about as far removed from the blues as you can get, it's a treat to hear such bluesy ditties as "Double Eyed Whammy" and "Somebody's Got to Burn," as well as the rockabilly raver "Mad About You." And from a blues standpoint, you've got to respect the special guests who drop by throughout -- Little Charlie Baty, Junior Watson, Richard Innes, and Larry Taylor. From beginning to end, JW-Jones does the blues with class and style throughout Bluelisted.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 320 kbps - 113 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b356h1d/n/jwj.rar

Lazy Lester - I Hear You Knocking - 1994.


Review:

Southern Louisiana swamp blues doesn't get more infectious or atmospheric than in the hands of Lazy Lester, whose late-'50s/early-'60s catalog for Excello Records (produced by the legendary J.D. Miller) is splendidly summarized with the 30 sides here. Lester's insistent harp and laconic vocals shine brightly on the rollicking "I'm a Lover, Not a Fighter," "Sugar Coated Love," "I Hear You Knockin'," and "If You Think I've Lost You," serving to help define the genre's timeless appeal.

Password and Link:
mississippimoan
mp3 192 kbps - 100 Mb
http://www.filefactory.com/file/b3572da/n/llihyk_rar